The UDP-glucose

Glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT), a key enzyme in ER quality control, plays a significant role in plant growth as well as biotic and abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

Francisca Blanco-Herrera, Adrián A. Moreno, Rodrigo Tapia, Francisca Reyes, Macarena Araya, Cecilia D'Alessio, Armando Parodi, Ariel Orellana

Resultado de la investigación: Article

25 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Background: UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) is a key player in the quality control mechanism (ER-QC) that newly synthesized glycoproteins undergo in the ER. It has been shown that the UGGT Arabidopsis orthologue is involved in ER-QC; however, its role in plant physiology remains unclear. Results: Here, we show that two mutant alleles in the At1g71220 locus have none or reduced UGGT activity. In wild type plants, the AtUGGT transcript levels increased upon activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Interestingly, mutants in AtUGGT exhibited an endogenous up-regulation of genes that are UPR targets. In addition, mutants in AtUGGT showed a 30 % reduction in the incorporation of UDP-Glucose into the ER suggesting that this enzyme drives the uptake of this substrate for the CNX/CRT cycle. Plants deficient in UGGT exhibited a delayed growth rate of the primary root and rosette as well as an alteration in the number of leaves. These mutants are more sensitive to pathogen attack as well as heat, salt, and UPR-inducing stressors. Additionally, the plants showed impairment in the establishment of systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Conclusions: These results show that a lack of UGGT activity alters plant vegetative development and impairs the response to several abiotic and biotic stresses. Moreover, our results uncover an unexpected role of UGGT in the incorporation of UDP-Glucose into the ER lumen in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Idioma originalEnglish
Número de artículo127
PublicaciónBMC Plant Biology
Volumen15
N.º1
DOI
EstadoPublished - 28 may 2015

Huella dactilar

glucosyltransferases
biotic stress
abiotic stress
quality control
glycoproteins
Arabidopsis thaliana
plant growth
glucose
enzymes
unfolded protein response
mutants
systemic acquired resistance
plant physiology
Arabidopsis
salts
alleles
uptake mechanisms
heat
loci
pathogens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Citar esto

@article{84d30a3cc98349b0b141b086234fc410,
title = "The UDP-glucose: Glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT), a key enzyme in ER quality control, plays a significant role in plant growth as well as biotic and abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana",
abstract = "Background: UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) is a key player in the quality control mechanism (ER-QC) that newly synthesized glycoproteins undergo in the ER. It has been shown that the UGGT Arabidopsis orthologue is involved in ER-QC; however, its role in plant physiology remains unclear. Results: Here, we show that two mutant alleles in the At1g71220 locus have none or reduced UGGT activity. In wild type plants, the AtUGGT transcript levels increased upon activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Interestingly, mutants in AtUGGT exhibited an endogenous up-regulation of genes that are UPR targets. In addition, mutants in AtUGGT showed a 30 {\%} reduction in the incorporation of UDP-Glucose into the ER suggesting that this enzyme drives the uptake of this substrate for the CNX/CRT cycle. Plants deficient in UGGT exhibited a delayed growth rate of the primary root and rosette as well as an alteration in the number of leaves. These mutants are more sensitive to pathogen attack as well as heat, salt, and UPR-inducing stressors. Additionally, the plants showed impairment in the establishment of systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Conclusions: These results show that a lack of UGGT activity alters plant vegetative development and impairs the response to several abiotic and biotic stresses. Moreover, our results uncover an unexpected role of UGGT in the incorporation of UDP-Glucose into the ER lumen in Arabidopsis thaliana.",
keywords = "Abiotic stress, Biotic stress, Endoplasmic reticulum, UGGT",
author = "Francisca Blanco-Herrera and Moreno, {Adri{\'a}n A.} and Rodrigo Tapia and Francisca Reyes and Macarena Araya and Cecilia D'Alessio and Armando Parodi and Ariel Orellana",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1186/s12870-015-0525-2",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
journal = "BMC Plant Biology",
issn = "1471-2229",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The UDP-glucose

T2 - Glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT), a key enzyme in ER quality control, plays a significant role in plant growth as well as biotic and abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

AU - Blanco-Herrera, Francisca

AU - Moreno, Adrián A.

AU - Tapia, Rodrigo

AU - Reyes, Francisca

AU - Araya, Macarena

AU - D'Alessio, Cecilia

AU - Parodi, Armando

AU - Orellana, Ariel

PY - 2015/5/28

Y1 - 2015/5/28

N2 - Background: UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) is a key player in the quality control mechanism (ER-QC) that newly synthesized glycoproteins undergo in the ER. It has been shown that the UGGT Arabidopsis orthologue is involved in ER-QC; however, its role in plant physiology remains unclear. Results: Here, we show that two mutant alleles in the At1g71220 locus have none or reduced UGGT activity. In wild type plants, the AtUGGT transcript levels increased upon activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Interestingly, mutants in AtUGGT exhibited an endogenous up-regulation of genes that are UPR targets. In addition, mutants in AtUGGT showed a 30 % reduction in the incorporation of UDP-Glucose into the ER suggesting that this enzyme drives the uptake of this substrate for the CNX/CRT cycle. Plants deficient in UGGT exhibited a delayed growth rate of the primary root and rosette as well as an alteration in the number of leaves. These mutants are more sensitive to pathogen attack as well as heat, salt, and UPR-inducing stressors. Additionally, the plants showed impairment in the establishment of systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Conclusions: These results show that a lack of UGGT activity alters plant vegetative development and impairs the response to several abiotic and biotic stresses. Moreover, our results uncover an unexpected role of UGGT in the incorporation of UDP-Glucose into the ER lumen in Arabidopsis thaliana.

AB - Background: UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) is a key player in the quality control mechanism (ER-QC) that newly synthesized glycoproteins undergo in the ER. It has been shown that the UGGT Arabidopsis orthologue is involved in ER-QC; however, its role in plant physiology remains unclear. Results: Here, we show that two mutant alleles in the At1g71220 locus have none or reduced UGGT activity. In wild type plants, the AtUGGT transcript levels increased upon activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Interestingly, mutants in AtUGGT exhibited an endogenous up-regulation of genes that are UPR targets. In addition, mutants in AtUGGT showed a 30 % reduction in the incorporation of UDP-Glucose into the ER suggesting that this enzyme drives the uptake of this substrate for the CNX/CRT cycle. Plants deficient in UGGT exhibited a delayed growth rate of the primary root and rosette as well as an alteration in the number of leaves. These mutants are more sensitive to pathogen attack as well as heat, salt, and UPR-inducing stressors. Additionally, the plants showed impairment in the establishment of systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Conclusions: These results show that a lack of UGGT activity alters plant vegetative development and impairs the response to several abiotic and biotic stresses. Moreover, our results uncover an unexpected role of UGGT in the incorporation of UDP-Glucose into the ER lumen in Arabidopsis thaliana.

KW - Abiotic stress

KW - Biotic stress

KW - Endoplasmic reticulum

KW - UGGT

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84931266325&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12870-015-0525-2

DO - 10.1186/s12870-015-0525-2

M3 - Article

VL - 15

JO - BMC Plant Biology

JF - BMC Plant Biology

SN - 1471-2229

IS - 1

M1 - 127

ER -