The oldest South American ichthyosaur from the late Triassic of northern Chile

M. Suarez, C. M. Bell

Resultado de la investigación: Article

6 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Ichthyosaur remains found in late Triassic shallow marine limestones in Quebrada Doña Inés Chica (latitude 26° 07′ S; longitude 69° 20′ W), northern Chile, are the oldest known ichthyosaur fossils from Central and South America. The previous oldest South American ichthyosaur was recorded in Hettangian rocks, also from northern Chile. The fossils comprise five worn teeth, one paddle bone and one scapula or humerus fragment, all collected from a single bed at the same locality. Although the material has not been identified to a generic or specific level, its presence alone broadens the knowledge of the distribution and habitat of Triassic ichthyosaurs. Late Triassic ammonites and brachiopods in the same stratum provide the age control.

Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)247-249
Número de páginas3
PublicaciónGeological Magazine
Volumen129
N.º2
DOI
EstadoPublished - 1992

Huella dactilar

Triassic
fossil
Hettangian
brachiopod
tooth
bone
limestone
habitat
rock
Central America
South America
distribution
material
longitude

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

Citar esto

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The oldest South American ichthyosaur from the late Triassic of northern Chile. / Suarez, M.; Bell, C. M.

En: Geological Magazine, Vol. 129, N.º 2, 1992, p. 247-249.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

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