The oceanic biological pump modulates the atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants to the Arctic

Cristóbal Galbán-Malagón, Naiara Berrojalbiz, María José Ojeda, Jordi Dachs

Resultado de la investigación: Article

72 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Semivolatile persistent organic pollutants have the potential to reach remote environments, such as the Arctic Ocean, through atmospheric transport and deposition. Here we show that this transport of polychlorinated biphenyls to the Arctic Ocean is strongly retarded by the oceanic biological pump. A simultaneous sampling of atmospheric, seawater and plankton samples was performed in July 2007 in the Greenland Current and Atlantic sector of the Arctic Ocean. The atmospheric concentrations declined during atmospheric transport over the Greenland Current with estimated half-lives of 1-4 days. These short half-lives can be explained by the high air-to-water net diffusive flux, which is similar in magnitude to the estimated settling fluxes in the water column. Therefore, the decrease of atmospheric concentrations is due to sequestration of atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyls by enhanced air-water diffusive fluxes driven by phytoplankton uptake and organic carbon settling fluxes (biological pump).

Idioma originalEnglish
Número de artículo862
PublicaciónNature Communications
Volumen3
DOI
EstadoPublished - 2012

Huella dactilar

Membrane Transport Proteins
Organic pollutants
Oceans and Seas
Greenland
contaminants
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
pumps
Fluxes
Arctic Ocean
Water
Air
Plankton
Carbon Cycle
Phytoplankton
polychlorinated biphenyls
Seawater
settling
half life
Organic carbon
plankton

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Citar esto

Galbán-Malagón, Cristóbal ; Berrojalbiz, Naiara ; Ojeda, María José ; Dachs, Jordi. / The oceanic biological pump modulates the atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants to the Arctic. En: Nature Communications. 2012 ; Vol. 3.
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abstract = "Semivolatile persistent organic pollutants have the potential to reach remote environments, such as the Arctic Ocean, through atmospheric transport and deposition. Here we show that this transport of polychlorinated biphenyls to the Arctic Ocean is strongly retarded by the oceanic biological pump. A simultaneous sampling of atmospheric, seawater and plankton samples was performed in July 2007 in the Greenland Current and Atlantic sector of the Arctic Ocean. The atmospheric concentrations declined during atmospheric transport over the Greenland Current with estimated half-lives of 1-4 days. These short half-lives can be explained by the high air-to-water net diffusive flux, which is similar in magnitude to the estimated settling fluxes in the water column. Therefore, the decrease of atmospheric concentrations is due to sequestration of atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyls by enhanced air-water diffusive fluxes driven by phytoplankton uptake and organic carbon settling fluxes (biological pump).",
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The oceanic biological pump modulates the atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants to the Arctic. / Galbán-Malagón, Cristóbal; Berrojalbiz, Naiara; Ojeda, María José; Dachs, Jordi.

En: Nature Communications, Vol. 3, 862, 2012.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - The oceanic biological pump modulates the atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants to the Arctic

AU - Galbán-Malagón, Cristóbal

AU - Berrojalbiz, Naiara

AU - Ojeda, María José

AU - Dachs, Jordi

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

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AB - Semivolatile persistent organic pollutants have the potential to reach remote environments, such as the Arctic Ocean, through atmospheric transport and deposition. Here we show that this transport of polychlorinated biphenyls to the Arctic Ocean is strongly retarded by the oceanic biological pump. A simultaneous sampling of atmospheric, seawater and plankton samples was performed in July 2007 in the Greenland Current and Atlantic sector of the Arctic Ocean. The atmospheric concentrations declined during atmospheric transport over the Greenland Current with estimated half-lives of 1-4 days. These short half-lives can be explained by the high air-to-water net diffusive flux, which is similar in magnitude to the estimated settling fluxes in the water column. Therefore, the decrease of atmospheric concentrations is due to sequestration of atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyls by enhanced air-water diffusive fluxes driven by phytoplankton uptake and organic carbon settling fluxes (biological pump).

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