The importance of cutaneous feedback on neural activation during maximal voluntary contraction

Carlos Cruz-Montecinos, Huub Maas, Carla Pellegrin-Friedmann, Claudio Tapia

Resultado de la investigación: Article

Resumen

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of cutaneous feedback on neural activation during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the ankle plantar flexors. Methods: The effects of cutaneous plantar anaesthesia were assessed in 15 subjects and compared to 15 controls, using a one-day pre/post-repeated measures design. Cutaneous plantar anaesthesia was induced by lidocaine injection at the centre of forefoot, lateral midfoot, and heel. Each subject performed isometric MVCs of the ankle plantar flexors. During each isometric ramp contraction, the following variables were assessed: maximal isometric torque; surface electromyography (EMG) activity of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles; and co-contraction index (CCI) between the MG and TA. Results: For ankle torque, two-way ANOVA showed no significant interaction between the pre/post-measurements × group (p = 0.166). However, MG activity presented significant interactions between the pre/post-measurements × group (p = 0.014). Post hoc comparisons indicated a decrease of MG activity in the experimental group, from 85.9 ± 11.9 to 62.7 ± 30.8% (p = 0.016). Additionally, the post-anaesthesia MG activity of the experimental group differed statistically with pre- and post-MG activity of the control group (p = 0.027 and p = 0.008, respectively). For TA activity and CCI, two-way ANOVA detected no significant interactions between the pre/post-measurements × group (p = 0.605 and p = 0.332, respectively). Conclusion: Our results indicate that during MVC, cutaneous feedback modulates neural activity to MG muscle, without changing the extent of MG–TA co-contraction.

Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)1-9
Número de páginas9
PublicaciónEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volumen117
N.º12
DOI
EstadoAccepted/In press - 10 oct 2017

Huella dactilar

Ankle
Skin
Anesthesia
Torque
Analysis of Variance
Architectural Accessibility
Isometric Contraction
Heel
Electromyography
Lidocaine
Skeletal Muscle
Muscles
Control Groups
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physiology (medical)

Citar esto

Cruz-Montecinos, Carlos ; Maas, Huub ; Pellegrin-Friedmann, Carla ; Tapia, Claudio. / The importance of cutaneous feedback on neural activation during maximal voluntary contraction. En: European Journal of Applied Physiology. 2017 ; Vol. 117, N.º 12. pp. 1-9.
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abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of cutaneous feedback on neural activation during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the ankle plantar flexors. Methods: The effects of cutaneous plantar anaesthesia were assessed in 15 subjects and compared to 15 controls, using a one-day pre/post-repeated measures design. Cutaneous plantar anaesthesia was induced by lidocaine injection at the centre of forefoot, lateral midfoot, and heel. Each subject performed isometric MVCs of the ankle plantar flexors. During each isometric ramp contraction, the following variables were assessed: maximal isometric torque; surface electromyography (EMG) activity of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles; and co-contraction index (CCI) between the MG and TA. Results: For ankle torque, two-way ANOVA showed no significant interaction between the pre/post-measurements × group (p = 0.166). However, MG activity presented significant interactions between the pre/post-measurements × group (p = 0.014). Post hoc comparisons indicated a decrease of MG activity in the experimental group, from 85.9 ± 11.9 to 62.7 ± 30.8{\%} (p = 0.016). Additionally, the post-anaesthesia MG activity of the experimental group differed statistically with pre- and post-MG activity of the control group (p = 0.027 and p = 0.008, respectively). For TA activity and CCI, two-way ANOVA detected no significant interactions between the pre/post-measurements × group (p = 0.605 and p = 0.332, respectively). Conclusion: Our results indicate that during MVC, cutaneous feedback modulates neural activity to MG muscle, without changing the extent of MG–TA co-contraction.",
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The importance of cutaneous feedback on neural activation during maximal voluntary contraction. / Cruz-Montecinos, Carlos; Maas, Huub; Pellegrin-Friedmann, Carla; Tapia, Claudio.

En: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 117, N.º 12, 10.10.2017, p. 1-9.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - The importance of cutaneous feedback on neural activation during maximal voluntary contraction

AU - Cruz-Montecinos, Carlos

AU - Maas, Huub

AU - Pellegrin-Friedmann, Carla

AU - Tapia, Claudio

PY - 2017/10/10

Y1 - 2017/10/10

N2 - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of cutaneous feedback on neural activation during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the ankle plantar flexors. Methods: The effects of cutaneous plantar anaesthesia were assessed in 15 subjects and compared to 15 controls, using a one-day pre/post-repeated measures design. Cutaneous plantar anaesthesia was induced by lidocaine injection at the centre of forefoot, lateral midfoot, and heel. Each subject performed isometric MVCs of the ankle plantar flexors. During each isometric ramp contraction, the following variables were assessed: maximal isometric torque; surface electromyography (EMG) activity of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles; and co-contraction index (CCI) between the MG and TA. Results: For ankle torque, two-way ANOVA showed no significant interaction between the pre/post-measurements × group (p = 0.166). However, MG activity presented significant interactions between the pre/post-measurements × group (p = 0.014). Post hoc comparisons indicated a decrease of MG activity in the experimental group, from 85.9 ± 11.9 to 62.7 ± 30.8% (p = 0.016). Additionally, the post-anaesthesia MG activity of the experimental group differed statistically with pre- and post-MG activity of the control group (p = 0.027 and p = 0.008, respectively). For TA activity and CCI, two-way ANOVA detected no significant interactions between the pre/post-measurements × group (p = 0.605 and p = 0.332, respectively). Conclusion: Our results indicate that during MVC, cutaneous feedback modulates neural activity to MG muscle, without changing the extent of MG–TA co-contraction.

AB - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of cutaneous feedback on neural activation during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the ankle plantar flexors. Methods: The effects of cutaneous plantar anaesthesia were assessed in 15 subjects and compared to 15 controls, using a one-day pre/post-repeated measures design. Cutaneous plantar anaesthesia was induced by lidocaine injection at the centre of forefoot, lateral midfoot, and heel. Each subject performed isometric MVCs of the ankle plantar flexors. During each isometric ramp contraction, the following variables were assessed: maximal isometric torque; surface electromyography (EMG) activity of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles; and co-contraction index (CCI) between the MG and TA. Results: For ankle torque, two-way ANOVA showed no significant interaction between the pre/post-measurements × group (p = 0.166). However, MG activity presented significant interactions between the pre/post-measurements × group (p = 0.014). Post hoc comparisons indicated a decrease of MG activity in the experimental group, from 85.9 ± 11.9 to 62.7 ± 30.8% (p = 0.016). Additionally, the post-anaesthesia MG activity of the experimental group differed statistically with pre- and post-MG activity of the control group (p = 0.027 and p = 0.008, respectively). For TA activity and CCI, two-way ANOVA detected no significant interactions between the pre/post-measurements × group (p = 0.605 and p = 0.332, respectively). Conclusion: Our results indicate that during MVC, cutaneous feedback modulates neural activity to MG muscle, without changing the extent of MG–TA co-contraction.

KW - Co-contraction

KW - Cutaneous feedback

KW - Maximum voluntary contraction

KW - Medial gastrocnemius

KW - Muscle mechanics

KW - Surface electromyography

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DO - 10.1007/s00421-017-3734-6

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