Subnuclear organization and trafficking of regulatory proteins: implications for biological control and cancer.

G. S. Stein, A. J. van Wijnen, J. L. Stein, J. B. Lian, M. Montecino, K. Zaidi, A. Javed

Resultado de la investigación: Review article

18 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

The regulated and regulatory components that interrelate nuclear structure and function must be experimentally established. A formidable challenge is to define further the control of transcription factor targeting to acceptor sites associated with the nuclear matrix. It will be important to determine whether acceptor proteins are associated with a pre-existing core-filament structural lattice or whether a compositely organized scaffold of regulatory factors is dynamically assembled. An inclusive model for all steps in the targeting of proteins to subnuclear sites cannot yet be proposed. However, this model must account for the apparent diversity of intranuclear targeting signals. It is also important to assess the extent to which regulatory discrimination is mediated by subnuclear domain-specific trafficking signals. Furthermore, the checkpoints that monitor subnuclear distribution of regulatory factors and the sorting steps that ensure both structural and functional fidelity of nuclear domains in which replication and expression of genes occur must be biochemically and mechanistically defined. There is emerging recognition that placement of regulatory components of gene expression must be temporally and spatially coordinated to facilitate biological control. The consequences of breaches in nuclear structure-function relationships are observed in an expanding series of diseases that include cancer [Weis et al., 1994; Rogaia et al., 1997; Yano et al., 1997; Rowley, 1998; Zeng et al., 1998; McNeil et al., 1999; Tao and Levine, 1999a] and neurological disorders [Skinner et al., 1997]. As the repertoire of architecture-associated regulatory factors and cofactors expands, workers in the field are becoming increasingly confident that nuclear organization contributes significantly to control of transcription. To gain increased appreciation for the complexities of subnuclear organization and gene regulation, we must continue to characterize mechanisms that direct regulatory proteins to specific transcription sites within the nucleus so that these proteins are in the right place at the right time. J. Cell. Biochem. Suppl. 35:84-92, 2000.

Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)84-92
Número de páginas9
PublicaciónJournal of cellular biochemistry. Supplement
VolumenSuppl 35
EstadoPublished - 2000

Huella dactilar

Protein Transport
Gene Expression
Nuclear Matrix
Neoplasms
Proteins
Regulator Genes
Nervous System Diseases
Health Personnel
Transcription Factors
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Citar esto

Stein, G. S. ; van Wijnen, A. J. ; Stein, J. L. ; Lian, J. B. ; Montecino, M. ; Zaidi, K. ; Javed, A. / Subnuclear organization and trafficking of regulatory proteins : implications for biological control and cancer. En: Journal of cellular biochemistry. Supplement. 2000 ; Vol. Suppl 35. pp. 84-92.
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title = "Subnuclear organization and trafficking of regulatory proteins: implications for biological control and cancer.",
abstract = "The regulated and regulatory components that interrelate nuclear structure and function must be experimentally established. A formidable challenge is to define further the control of transcription factor targeting to acceptor sites associated with the nuclear matrix. It will be important to determine whether acceptor proteins are associated with a pre-existing core-filament structural lattice or whether a compositely organized scaffold of regulatory factors is dynamically assembled. An inclusive model for all steps in the targeting of proteins to subnuclear sites cannot yet be proposed. However, this model must account for the apparent diversity of intranuclear targeting signals. It is also important to assess the extent to which regulatory discrimination is mediated by subnuclear domain-specific trafficking signals. Furthermore, the checkpoints that monitor subnuclear distribution of regulatory factors and the sorting steps that ensure both structural and functional fidelity of nuclear domains in which replication and expression of genes occur must be biochemically and mechanistically defined. There is emerging recognition that placement of regulatory components of gene expression must be temporally and spatially coordinated to facilitate biological control. The consequences of breaches in nuclear structure-function relationships are observed in an expanding series of diseases that include cancer [Weis et al., 1994; Rogaia et al., 1997; Yano et al., 1997; Rowley, 1998; Zeng et al., 1998; McNeil et al., 1999; Tao and Levine, 1999a] and neurological disorders [Skinner et al., 1997]. As the repertoire of architecture-associated regulatory factors and cofactors expands, workers in the field are becoming increasingly confident that nuclear organization contributes significantly to control of transcription. To gain increased appreciation for the complexities of subnuclear organization and gene regulation, we must continue to characterize mechanisms that direct regulatory proteins to specific transcription sites within the nucleus so that these proteins are in the right place at the right time. J. Cell. Biochem. Suppl. 35:84-92, 2000.",
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Subnuclear organization and trafficking of regulatory proteins : implications for biological control and cancer. / Stein, G. S.; van Wijnen, A. J.; Stein, J. L.; Lian, J. B.; Montecino, M.; Zaidi, K.; Javed, A.

En: Journal of cellular biochemistry. Supplement, Vol. Suppl 35, 2000, p. 84-92.

Resultado de la investigación: Review article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Subnuclear organization and trafficking of regulatory proteins

T2 - implications for biological control and cancer.

AU - Stein, G. S.

AU - van Wijnen, A. J.

AU - Stein, J. L.

AU - Lian, J. B.

AU - Montecino, M.

AU - Zaidi, K.

AU - Javed, A.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - The regulated and regulatory components that interrelate nuclear structure and function must be experimentally established. A formidable challenge is to define further the control of transcription factor targeting to acceptor sites associated with the nuclear matrix. It will be important to determine whether acceptor proteins are associated with a pre-existing core-filament structural lattice or whether a compositely organized scaffold of regulatory factors is dynamically assembled. An inclusive model for all steps in the targeting of proteins to subnuclear sites cannot yet be proposed. However, this model must account for the apparent diversity of intranuclear targeting signals. It is also important to assess the extent to which regulatory discrimination is mediated by subnuclear domain-specific trafficking signals. Furthermore, the checkpoints that monitor subnuclear distribution of regulatory factors and the sorting steps that ensure both structural and functional fidelity of nuclear domains in which replication and expression of genes occur must be biochemically and mechanistically defined. There is emerging recognition that placement of regulatory components of gene expression must be temporally and spatially coordinated to facilitate biological control. The consequences of breaches in nuclear structure-function relationships are observed in an expanding series of diseases that include cancer [Weis et al., 1994; Rogaia et al., 1997; Yano et al., 1997; Rowley, 1998; Zeng et al., 1998; McNeil et al., 1999; Tao and Levine, 1999a] and neurological disorders [Skinner et al., 1997]. As the repertoire of architecture-associated regulatory factors and cofactors expands, workers in the field are becoming increasingly confident that nuclear organization contributes significantly to control of transcription. To gain increased appreciation for the complexities of subnuclear organization and gene regulation, we must continue to characterize mechanisms that direct regulatory proteins to specific transcription sites within the nucleus so that these proteins are in the right place at the right time. J. Cell. Biochem. Suppl. 35:84-92, 2000.

AB - The regulated and regulatory components that interrelate nuclear structure and function must be experimentally established. A formidable challenge is to define further the control of transcription factor targeting to acceptor sites associated with the nuclear matrix. It will be important to determine whether acceptor proteins are associated with a pre-existing core-filament structural lattice or whether a compositely organized scaffold of regulatory factors is dynamically assembled. An inclusive model for all steps in the targeting of proteins to subnuclear sites cannot yet be proposed. However, this model must account for the apparent diversity of intranuclear targeting signals. It is also important to assess the extent to which regulatory discrimination is mediated by subnuclear domain-specific trafficking signals. Furthermore, the checkpoints that monitor subnuclear distribution of regulatory factors and the sorting steps that ensure both structural and functional fidelity of nuclear domains in which replication and expression of genes occur must be biochemically and mechanistically defined. There is emerging recognition that placement of regulatory components of gene expression must be temporally and spatially coordinated to facilitate biological control. The consequences of breaches in nuclear structure-function relationships are observed in an expanding series of diseases that include cancer [Weis et al., 1994; Rogaia et al., 1997; Yano et al., 1997; Rowley, 1998; Zeng et al., 1998; McNeil et al., 1999; Tao and Levine, 1999a] and neurological disorders [Skinner et al., 1997]. As the repertoire of architecture-associated regulatory factors and cofactors expands, workers in the field are becoming increasingly confident that nuclear organization contributes significantly to control of transcription. To gain increased appreciation for the complexities of subnuclear organization and gene regulation, we must continue to characterize mechanisms that direct regulatory proteins to specific transcription sites within the nucleus so that these proteins are in the right place at the right time. J. Cell. Biochem. Suppl. 35:84-92, 2000.

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EP - 92

JO - Journal of cellular biochemistry. Supplement

JF - Journal of cellular biochemistry. Supplement

SN - 0733-1959

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