Preparation, molecular weight, base composition, and secondary structure of giant nuclear ribonucleic acid

David S. Holmes, James Bonner

Resultado de la investigación: Article

247 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Previous methods of heterogeneous ribonucleic acid (HnRNA) extraction yield material which "disaggregates" into small molecules. This could be the fault of either ribonuclease knicks in the polymers sustained during the extraction procedure or disaggregation into real subunits. The present communication distinguishes between these possibilities by describing an RNA extraction procedure which does not yield subunits when HnRNA is denatured. By the criteria of sedimentation through sucrose, formaldehyde, and dimethyl sulfoxide, it is estimated that the majority of the radioactivity of giant HnRNA after a 30-min pulse of [3H]uridine is associated with molecules in the range 5-10 × 106 daltons. In the electron microscope, under denaturing conditions, 84% (mass %) of giant HnRNA has a contour length of 4-9 μ corresponding to a molecular weight of about 5-10 × 106. Giant HnRNA has a "DNA-like" base composition (G + C = 46-54%) and has considerable secondary structure (ca. 60% helix conformation) as judged by its melting profile and reactivity with formaldehyde.

Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)2330-2338
Número de páginas9
PublicaciónBiochemistry
Volumen12
N.º12
EstadoPublished - 1973

Huella dactilar

Base Composition
Molecular Weight
Molecular weight
RNA
Chemical analysis
Formaldehyde
Molecules
Uridine
Radioactivity
Ribonucleases
Dimethyl Sulfoxide
Sedimentation
Freezing
Sucrose
Conformations
Polymers
Melting
Electron microscopes
Electrons
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Citar esto

Holmes, David S. ; Bonner, James. / Preparation, molecular weight, base composition, and secondary structure of giant nuclear ribonucleic acid. En: Biochemistry. 1973 ; Vol. 12, N.º 12. pp. 2330-2338.
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Preparation, molecular weight, base composition, and secondary structure of giant nuclear ribonucleic acid. / Holmes, David S.; Bonner, James.

En: Biochemistry, Vol. 12, N.º 12, 1973, p. 2330-2338.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Preparation, molecular weight, base composition, and secondary structure of giant nuclear ribonucleic acid

AU - Holmes, David S.

AU - Bonner, James

PY - 1973

Y1 - 1973

N2 - Previous methods of heterogeneous ribonucleic acid (HnRNA) extraction yield material which "disaggregates" into small molecules. This could be the fault of either ribonuclease knicks in the polymers sustained during the extraction procedure or disaggregation into real subunits. The present communication distinguishes between these possibilities by describing an RNA extraction procedure which does not yield subunits when HnRNA is denatured. By the criteria of sedimentation through sucrose, formaldehyde, and dimethyl sulfoxide, it is estimated that the majority of the radioactivity of giant HnRNA after a 30-min pulse of [3H]uridine is associated with molecules in the range 5-10 × 106 daltons. In the electron microscope, under denaturing conditions, 84% (mass %) of giant HnRNA has a contour length of 4-9 μ corresponding to a molecular weight of about 5-10 × 106. Giant HnRNA has a "DNA-like" base composition (G + C = 46-54%) and has considerable secondary structure (ca. 60% helix conformation) as judged by its melting profile and reactivity with formaldehyde.

AB - Previous methods of heterogeneous ribonucleic acid (HnRNA) extraction yield material which "disaggregates" into small molecules. This could be the fault of either ribonuclease knicks in the polymers sustained during the extraction procedure or disaggregation into real subunits. The present communication distinguishes between these possibilities by describing an RNA extraction procedure which does not yield subunits when HnRNA is denatured. By the criteria of sedimentation through sucrose, formaldehyde, and dimethyl sulfoxide, it is estimated that the majority of the radioactivity of giant HnRNA after a 30-min pulse of [3H]uridine is associated with molecules in the range 5-10 × 106 daltons. In the electron microscope, under denaturing conditions, 84% (mass %) of giant HnRNA has a contour length of 4-9 μ corresponding to a molecular weight of about 5-10 × 106. Giant HnRNA has a "DNA-like" base composition (G + C = 46-54%) and has considerable secondary structure (ca. 60% helix conformation) as judged by its melting profile and reactivity with formaldehyde.

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