People with dementia living alone: What are their needs and what kind of support are they receiving?

Claudia Miranda-Castillo, Bob Woods, Martin Orrell

Resultado de la investigación: Article

68 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Background: In the U.K. about 141,460 people with dementia (PWD) live alone. They are at risk of social isolation and inadequate social and medical supervision. The aims of this study were to identify the needs of PWD living alone and to compare the needs of PWD living alone versus those living with others. It was predicted that PWD living alone would have significantly more unmet needs than those living with others. Methods: 152 PWD were interviewed about their cognitive status and quality of life (QoL); and 128 informal carers were interviewed about the PWD's QoL, social networks, behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD), functional status, and services used. For 24 PWD no carer was available. Carers were also interviewed about their own symptoms of depression, anxiety, burden, and satisfaction. Researchers rated PWD's needs. One-third of the PWD (50) were living alone. Results: PWD living alone had significantly more unmet needs (M = 3.9, s.d. 3.1) than those living with others (M = 2.0, s.d. 2.0) (U = 1578, p < 0.01) particularly in the areas of looking after home (2 = 17.23, p < 0.001), food (2 = 13.91, p < 0.002), self-care (2 = 10.23, p < 0.002) and accidental self-harm (2 = 16.51, p < 0.001). The most frequent unmet needs were daytime activities (27, 54.0%), company (26, 52.0%), psychological distress (22, 44.0%), eyesight/hearing (16, 32.0%), and accidental self-harm (16, 32.0%). Conclusion: PWD living alone are a vulnerable group who are at increased risk for unmet social, environmental, psychological and medical needs. This study illustrates the need to identify these individuals and to make provisions among social service agencies to monitor their well-being regularly and provide a higher level of support when needs are identified.

Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)607-617
Número de páginas11
PublicaciónInternational Psychogeriatrics
Volumen22
N.º4
DOI
EstadoPublished - 1 ene 2010

Huella dactilar

Dementia
Caregivers
Psychology
Quality of Life
Behavioral Symptoms
Social Isolation
Self Care
Social Work
Social Support
Hearing
Anxiety
Research Personnel
Depression
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Citar esto

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title = "People with dementia living alone: What are their needs and what kind of support are they receiving?",
abstract = "Background: In the U.K. about 141,460 people with dementia (PWD) live alone. They are at risk of social isolation and inadequate social and medical supervision. The aims of this study were to identify the needs of PWD living alone and to compare the needs of PWD living alone versus those living with others. It was predicted that PWD living alone would have significantly more unmet needs than those living with others. Methods: 152 PWD were interviewed about their cognitive status and quality of life (QoL); and 128 informal carers were interviewed about the PWD's QoL, social networks, behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD), functional status, and services used. For 24 PWD no carer was available. Carers were also interviewed about their own symptoms of depression, anxiety, burden, and satisfaction. Researchers rated PWD's needs. One-third of the PWD (50) were living alone. Results: PWD living alone had significantly more unmet needs (M = 3.9, s.d. 3.1) than those living with others (M = 2.0, s.d. 2.0) (U = 1578, p < 0.01) particularly in the areas of looking after home (2 = 17.23, p < 0.001), food (2 = 13.91, p < 0.002), self-care (2 = 10.23, p < 0.002) and accidental self-harm (2 = 16.51, p < 0.001). The most frequent unmet needs were daytime activities (27, 54.0{\%}), company (26, 52.0{\%}), psychological distress (22, 44.0{\%}), eyesight/hearing (16, 32.0{\%}), and accidental self-harm (16, 32.0{\%}). Conclusion: PWD living alone are a vulnerable group who are at increased risk for unmet social, environmental, psychological and medical needs. This study illustrates the need to identify these individuals and to make provisions among social service agencies to monitor their well-being regularly and provide a higher level of support when needs are identified.",
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People with dementia living alone : What are their needs and what kind of support are they receiving? / Miranda-Castillo, Claudia; Woods, Bob; Orrell, Martin.

En: International Psychogeriatrics, Vol. 22, N.º 4, 01.01.2010, p. 607-617.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

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T2 - What are their needs and what kind of support are they receiving?

AU - Miranda-Castillo, Claudia

AU - Woods, Bob

AU - Orrell, Martin

PY - 2010/1/1

Y1 - 2010/1/1

N2 - Background: In the U.K. about 141,460 people with dementia (PWD) live alone. They are at risk of social isolation and inadequate social and medical supervision. The aims of this study were to identify the needs of PWD living alone and to compare the needs of PWD living alone versus those living with others. It was predicted that PWD living alone would have significantly more unmet needs than those living with others. Methods: 152 PWD were interviewed about their cognitive status and quality of life (QoL); and 128 informal carers were interviewed about the PWD's QoL, social networks, behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD), functional status, and services used. For 24 PWD no carer was available. Carers were also interviewed about their own symptoms of depression, anxiety, burden, and satisfaction. Researchers rated PWD's needs. One-third of the PWD (50) were living alone. Results: PWD living alone had significantly more unmet needs (M = 3.9, s.d. 3.1) than those living with others (M = 2.0, s.d. 2.0) (U = 1578, p < 0.01) particularly in the areas of looking after home (2 = 17.23, p < 0.001), food (2 = 13.91, p < 0.002), self-care (2 = 10.23, p < 0.002) and accidental self-harm (2 = 16.51, p < 0.001). The most frequent unmet needs were daytime activities (27, 54.0%), company (26, 52.0%), psychological distress (22, 44.0%), eyesight/hearing (16, 32.0%), and accidental self-harm (16, 32.0%). Conclusion: PWD living alone are a vulnerable group who are at increased risk for unmet social, environmental, psychological and medical needs. This study illustrates the need to identify these individuals and to make provisions among social service agencies to monitor their well-being regularly and provide a higher level of support when needs are identified.

AB - Background: In the U.K. about 141,460 people with dementia (PWD) live alone. They are at risk of social isolation and inadequate social and medical supervision. The aims of this study were to identify the needs of PWD living alone and to compare the needs of PWD living alone versus those living with others. It was predicted that PWD living alone would have significantly more unmet needs than those living with others. Methods: 152 PWD were interviewed about their cognitive status and quality of life (QoL); and 128 informal carers were interviewed about the PWD's QoL, social networks, behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD), functional status, and services used. For 24 PWD no carer was available. Carers were also interviewed about their own symptoms of depression, anxiety, burden, and satisfaction. Researchers rated PWD's needs. One-third of the PWD (50) were living alone. Results: PWD living alone had significantly more unmet needs (M = 3.9, s.d. 3.1) than those living with others (M = 2.0, s.d. 2.0) (U = 1578, p < 0.01) particularly in the areas of looking after home (2 = 17.23, p < 0.001), food (2 = 13.91, p < 0.002), self-care (2 = 10.23, p < 0.002) and accidental self-harm (2 = 16.51, p < 0.001). The most frequent unmet needs were daytime activities (27, 54.0%), company (26, 52.0%), psychological distress (22, 44.0%), eyesight/hearing (16, 32.0%), and accidental self-harm (16, 32.0%). Conclusion: PWD living alone are a vulnerable group who are at increased risk for unmet social, environmental, psychological and medical needs. This study illustrates the need to identify these individuals and to make provisions among social service agencies to monitor their well-being regularly and provide a higher level of support when needs are identified.

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