Mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running have larger midbrains: Support for the mosaic model of brain evolution

E. M. Kolb, E. L. Rezende, L. Holness, A. Radtke, S. K. Lee, A. Obenaus, T. Garland

Resultado de la investigación: Article

30 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Increased brain size, relative to body mass, is a primary characteristic distinguishing the mammalian lineage. This greater encephalization has come with increased behavioral complexity and, accordingly, it has been suggested that selection on behavioral traits has been a significant factor leading to the evolution of larger whole-brain mass. In addition, brains may evolve in a mosaic fashion, with functional components having some freedom to evolve independently from other components, irrespective of, or in addition to, changes in size of the whole brain. We tested whether long-term selective breeding for high voluntary wheel running in laboratory house mice results in changes in brain size, and whether those changes have occurred in a concerted or mosaic fashion. We measured wet and dry brain mass via dissections and brain volume with ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging of brains that distinguished the caudate-putamen, hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum and forebrain. Adjusting for body mass as a covariate, mice from the four replicate high-runner (HR) lines had statistically larger non-cerebellar wet and dry brain masses than those from four non-selected control lines, with no differences in cerebellum wet or dry mass or volume. Moreover, the midbrain volume in HR mice was ∼13% larger (P<0.05), while volumes of the caudate-putamen, hippocampus, cerebellum and forebrain did not differ statistically between HR and control lines. We hypothesize that the enlarged midbrain of HR mice is related to altered neurophysiological function in their dopaminergic system. To our knowledge, this is the first example in which selection for a particular mammalian behavior has been shown to result in a change in size of a specific brain region.

Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)515-523
Número de páginas9
PublicaciónJournal of Experimental Biology
Volumen216
N.º3
DOI
EstadoPublished - 1 feb 2013

Huella dactilar

wheels
Mesencephalon
Running
brain
breeds
mice
Brain
Cerebellum
Putamen
cerebellum
Prosencephalon
body mass
Hippocampus
mosaic
hippocampus
selective breeding
dissection
Dissection
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Mus musculus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Physiology
  • Aquatic Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Insect Science

Citar esto

Kolb, E. M. ; Rezende, E. L. ; Holness, L. ; Radtke, A. ; Lee, S. K. ; Obenaus, A. ; Garland, T. / Mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running have larger midbrains : Support for the mosaic model of brain evolution. En: Journal of Experimental Biology. 2013 ; Vol. 216, N.º 3. pp. 515-523.
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Mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running have larger midbrains : Support for the mosaic model of brain evolution. / Kolb, E. M.; Rezende, E. L.; Holness, L.; Radtke, A.; Lee, S. K.; Obenaus, A.; Garland, T.

En: Journal of Experimental Biology, Vol. 216, N.º 3, 01.02.2013, p. 515-523.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

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T1 - Mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running have larger midbrains

T2 - Support for the mosaic model of brain evolution

AU - Kolb, E. M.

AU - Rezende, E. L.

AU - Holness, L.

AU - Radtke, A.

AU - Lee, S. K.

AU - Obenaus, A.

AU - Garland, T.

PY - 2013/2/1

Y1 - 2013/2/1

N2 - Increased brain size, relative to body mass, is a primary characteristic distinguishing the mammalian lineage. This greater encephalization has come with increased behavioral complexity and, accordingly, it has been suggested that selection on behavioral traits has been a significant factor leading to the evolution of larger whole-brain mass. In addition, brains may evolve in a mosaic fashion, with functional components having some freedom to evolve independently from other components, irrespective of, or in addition to, changes in size of the whole brain. We tested whether long-term selective breeding for high voluntary wheel running in laboratory house mice results in changes in brain size, and whether those changes have occurred in a concerted or mosaic fashion. We measured wet and dry brain mass via dissections and brain volume with ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging of brains that distinguished the caudate-putamen, hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum and forebrain. Adjusting for body mass as a covariate, mice from the four replicate high-runner (HR) lines had statistically larger non-cerebellar wet and dry brain masses than those from four non-selected control lines, with no differences in cerebellum wet or dry mass or volume. Moreover, the midbrain volume in HR mice was ∼13% larger (P<0.05), while volumes of the caudate-putamen, hippocampus, cerebellum and forebrain did not differ statistically between HR and control lines. We hypothesize that the enlarged midbrain of HR mice is related to altered neurophysiological function in their dopaminergic system. To our knowledge, this is the first example in which selection for a particular mammalian behavior has been shown to result in a change in size of a specific brain region.

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