Marine metal pollution and effects on seaweed species

Loretto Contreras-Porcia, Andrés Meynard, Camilo López-Cristoffanini, Nicolas Latorre, Manoj Kumar

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a los tipos de informe/libroCapítulo

2 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Heavy metals are significant pollutants continuously released into the biosphere, both naturally and anthropogenically. Conceptually, metal speciation, bioavailability, and associated toxicity in marine organisms depend on a wide array of abiotic and biotic factors. Among these, pH variation is one of the most important environmental factors influencing metal speciation and toxicity. Due to this, ocean acidification is expected to modify metal speciation, altering the effects these nondegradable contaminants have on marine organisms, such as seaweeds. One clear effect of heavy metals on seaweeds is the rapid formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The production of ROS beyond the physiological tolerance threshold causes an oxidative stress condition that, if not attenuated, can irreversibly damage cellular constituents such as DNA/RNA, proteins, and lipids. To cope with heavy metal excess, several mechanisms exist in tolerant seaweed species, including the activation of an efficient ROS-scavenging system constituted by metal-binding compounds, antioxidant enzymes, and oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids, among others. Another adaptive mechanism involves the participation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins in translocating a wide variety of compounds across cell membranes, including heavy metals. In contrast, an excessive heavy metal presence can inhibit photosynthesis, reduce pigment concentration and growth, induce cation losses, and disrupt gametophyte development in non-tolerant seaweed species. In a scenario of lowered ocean pH and increased heavy metal toxicity, the important roles played by non-tolerant seaweed species in structuring communities could be severely compromised, with unknown consequences for associated organisms. Therefore, in the upcoming decades, marine pollution could majorly shift and rearrange community compositions and the distributional ranges of species.

Idioma originalInglés
Título de la publicación alojadaSystems Biology of Marine Ecosystems
EditorialSpringer International Publishing AG
Páginas35-48
Número de páginas14
ISBN (versión digital)9783319620947
ISBN (versión impresa)9783319620923
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 1 ene 2017

Áreas temáticas de ASJC Scopus

  • Agricultura y biología (todo)
  • Ciencias ambientales (todo)
  • Bioquímica, genética y biología molecular (todo)
  • Medicina (todo)

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    Contreras-Porcia, L., Meynard, A., López-Cristoffanini, C., Latorre, N., & Kumar, M. (2017). Marine metal pollution and effects on seaweed species. En Systems Biology of Marine Ecosystems (pp. 35-48). Springer International Publishing AG. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-62094-7_3