Inhibitory effect of biofilm-forming Lactobacillus kunkeei strains against virulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in honeycomb moth (Galleria mellonella) infection model

P. Berríos, J. A. Fuentes, D. Salas, A. Carreño, P. Aldea, F. Fernández, A. N. Trombert

Resultado de la investigación: Article

5 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Biofilms correspond to complex communities of microorganisms embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix. Biofilm lifestyle predominates in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic Gram negative pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of infections in humans, plants and animals. In this context, anti-biofilm can be considered a key strategy to control P. aeruginosa infections, thereby more research in the field is required. On the other hand, Lactobacillus species have been described as beneficial due to their anti-biofilm properties and their consequent effect against a wide spectrum of pathogens. In fact, biofilm-forming Lactobacilli seem to be more efficient than their planktonic counterpart to antagonise pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus kunkeei, a novel Lactobacillus species isolated from honeybee guts, can form biofilms in vitro. In addition, the L. kunkeei biofilm can, in turn, inhibit the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Finally, we found that L. kunkeei strains attenuate infection of P. aeruginosa in the Galleria mellonella model, presumably by affecting P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and/or their stability. Since L. kunkeei presents characteristics of a probiotic, this work provides evidence arguing that the use of this Lactobacillus species in both animals (including insects) and humans could contribute to impair P. aeruginosa biofilm formation.

Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)257-268
Número de páginas12
PublicaciónBeneficial microbes
Volumen9
N.º2
DOI
EstadoPublished - 1 ene 2018

Huella dactilar

Moths
Lactobacillus
Biofilms
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Infection
In Vitro Techniques
Pseudomonas Infections
Probiotics
Extracellular Matrix
Insects
Life Style
Bacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Citar esto

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title = "Inhibitory effect of biofilm-forming Lactobacillus kunkeei strains against virulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in honeycomb moth (Galleria mellonella) infection model",
abstract = "Biofilms correspond to complex communities of microorganisms embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix. Biofilm lifestyle predominates in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic Gram negative pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of infections in humans, plants and animals. In this context, anti-biofilm can be considered a key strategy to control P. aeruginosa infections, thereby more research in the field is required. On the other hand, Lactobacillus species have been described as beneficial due to their anti-biofilm properties and their consequent effect against a wide spectrum of pathogens. In fact, biofilm-forming Lactobacilli seem to be more efficient than their planktonic counterpart to antagonise pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus kunkeei, a novel Lactobacillus species isolated from honeybee guts, can form biofilms in vitro. In addition, the L. kunkeei biofilm can, in turn, inhibit the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Finally, we found that L. kunkeei strains attenuate infection of P. aeruginosa in the Galleria mellonella model, presumably by affecting P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and/or their stability. Since L. kunkeei presents characteristics of a probiotic, this work provides evidence arguing that the use of this Lactobacillus species in both animals (including insects) and humans could contribute to impair P. aeruginosa biofilm formation.",
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Inhibitory effect of biofilm-forming Lactobacillus kunkeei strains against virulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in honeycomb moth (Galleria mellonella) infection model. / Berríos, P.; Fuentes, J. A.; Salas, D.; Carreño, A.; Aldea, P.; Fernández, F.; Trombert, A. N.

En: Beneficial microbes, Vol. 9, N.º 2, 01.01.2018, p. 257-268.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inhibitory effect of biofilm-forming Lactobacillus kunkeei strains against virulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in honeycomb moth (Galleria mellonella) infection model

AU - Berríos, P.

AU - Fuentes, J. A.

AU - Salas, D.

AU - Carreño, A.

AU - Aldea, P.

AU - Fernández, F.

AU - Trombert, A. N.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Biofilms correspond to complex communities of microorganisms embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix. Biofilm lifestyle predominates in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic Gram negative pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of infections in humans, plants and animals. In this context, anti-biofilm can be considered a key strategy to control P. aeruginosa infections, thereby more research in the field is required. On the other hand, Lactobacillus species have been described as beneficial due to their anti-biofilm properties and their consequent effect against a wide spectrum of pathogens. In fact, biofilm-forming Lactobacilli seem to be more efficient than their planktonic counterpart to antagonise pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus kunkeei, a novel Lactobacillus species isolated from honeybee guts, can form biofilms in vitro. In addition, the L. kunkeei biofilm can, in turn, inhibit the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Finally, we found that L. kunkeei strains attenuate infection of P. aeruginosa in the Galleria mellonella model, presumably by affecting P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and/or their stability. Since L. kunkeei presents characteristics of a probiotic, this work provides evidence arguing that the use of this Lactobacillus species in both animals (including insects) and humans could contribute to impair P. aeruginosa biofilm formation.

AB - Biofilms correspond to complex communities of microorganisms embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix. Biofilm lifestyle predominates in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic Gram negative pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of infections in humans, plants and animals. In this context, anti-biofilm can be considered a key strategy to control P. aeruginosa infections, thereby more research in the field is required. On the other hand, Lactobacillus species have been described as beneficial due to their anti-biofilm properties and their consequent effect against a wide spectrum of pathogens. In fact, biofilm-forming Lactobacilli seem to be more efficient than their planktonic counterpart to antagonise pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus kunkeei, a novel Lactobacillus species isolated from honeybee guts, can form biofilms in vitro. In addition, the L. kunkeei biofilm can, in turn, inhibit the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Finally, we found that L. kunkeei strains attenuate infection of P. aeruginosa in the Galleria mellonella model, presumably by affecting P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and/or their stability. Since L. kunkeei presents characteristics of a probiotic, this work provides evidence arguing that the use of this Lactobacillus species in both animals (including insects) and humans could contribute to impair P. aeruginosa biofilm formation.

KW - Biofilm

KW - Galleria mellonella

KW - Lactobacillus kunkeei

KW - Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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