Induction of protective effector immunity to prevent pathogenesis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus. Implications on therapy and vaccine design

Janyra A. Espinoza, Susan M. Bueno, Claudia A. Riedel, Alexis M. Kalergis

Resultado de la investigación: Article

8 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of respiratory illness in infants and young children around the globe. This pathogen, which was discovered in 1956, continues to cause a huge number of hospitalizations due to respiratory disease and it is considered a health and economic burden worldwide, especially in developing countries. The immune response elicited by hRSV infection leads to lung and systemic inflammation, which results in lung damage but is not efficient at preventing viral replication. Indeed, natural hRSV infection induces a poor immune memory that allows recurrent infections. Here, we review the most recent knowledge about the lifecycle of hRSV, the immune response elicited by this virus and the subsequent pathology induced in response to infection in the airways. Novel findings about the alterations that this virus causes in the central nervous system and potential therapies and vaccines designed to treat or prevent hRSV infection are discussed.

Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)1-12
Número de páginas12
PublicaciónImmunology
Volumen143
N.º1
DOI
EstadoPublished - 2014

Huella dactilar

Human respiratory syncytial virus
Active Immunotherapy
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Immunity
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections
Viruses
Infection
Developing Countries
Pneumonia
Hospitalization
Central Nervous System
Economics
Pathology
Lung
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Citar esto

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abstract = "Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of respiratory illness in infants and young children around the globe. This pathogen, which was discovered in 1956, continues to cause a huge number of hospitalizations due to respiratory disease and it is considered a health and economic burden worldwide, especially in developing countries. The immune response elicited by hRSV infection leads to lung and systemic inflammation, which results in lung damage but is not efficient at preventing viral replication. Indeed, natural hRSV infection induces a poor immune memory that allows recurrent infections. Here, we review the most recent knowledge about the lifecycle of hRSV, the immune response elicited by this virus and the subsequent pathology induced in response to infection in the airways. Novel findings about the alterations that this virus causes in the central nervous system and potential therapies and vaccines designed to treat or prevent hRSV infection are discussed.",
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Induction of protective effector immunity to prevent pathogenesis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus. Implications on therapy and vaccine design. / Espinoza, Janyra A.; Bueno, Susan M.; Riedel, Claudia A.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

En: Immunology, Vol. 143, N.º 1, 2014, p. 1-12.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Induction of protective effector immunity to prevent pathogenesis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus. Implications on therapy and vaccine design

AU - Espinoza, Janyra A.

AU - Bueno, Susan M.

AU - Riedel, Claudia A.

AU - Kalergis, Alexis M.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

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AB - Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of respiratory illness in infants and young children around the globe. This pathogen, which was discovered in 1956, continues to cause a huge number of hospitalizations due to respiratory disease and it is considered a health and economic burden worldwide, especially in developing countries. The immune response elicited by hRSV infection leads to lung and systemic inflammation, which results in lung damage but is not efficient at preventing viral replication. Indeed, natural hRSV infection induces a poor immune memory that allows recurrent infections. Here, we review the most recent knowledge about the lifecycle of hRSV, the immune response elicited by this virus and the subsequent pathology induced in response to infection in the airways. Novel findings about the alterations that this virus causes in the central nervous system and potential therapies and vaccines designed to treat or prevent hRSV infection are discussed.

KW - HRSV

KW - Lung

KW - T helper type 1/type 2 cells

KW - Vaccination

KW - Viral

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