In-home environmental exposures predicted from geospatial characteristics of the built environment and electronic health records of children with asthma

Matthew Bozigar, Catherine L. Connolly, Aaron Legler, William G. Adams, Chad W. Milando, David B. Reynolds, Fei Carnes, Raquel B. Jimenez, Komal Peer, Kimberly Vermeer, Jonathan I. Levy, Maria Patricia Fabian

Producción científica: Contribución a una revistaArtículorevisión exhaustiva

3 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Purpose: Children may be exposed to numerous in-home environmental exposures (IHEE) that trigger asthma exacerbations. Spatially linking social and environmental exposures to electronic health records (EHR) can aid exposure assessment, epidemiology, and clinical treatment, but EHR data on exposures are missing for many children with asthma. To address the issue, we predicted presence of indoor asthma trigger allergens, and estimated effects of their key geospatial predictors. Methods: Our study samples were comprised of children with asthma who provided self-reported IHEE data in EHR at a safety-net hospital in New England during 2004–2015. We used an ensemble machine learning algorithm and 86 multilevel features (e.g., individual, housing, neighborhood) to predict presence of cockroaches, rodents (mice or rats), mold, and bedroom carpeting/rugs in homes. We reduced dimensionality via elastic net regression and estimated effects by the G-computation causal inference method. Results: Our models reasonably predicted presence of cockroaches (area under receiver operating curves [AUC] = 0.65), rodents (AUC = 0.64), and bedroom carpeting/rugs (AUC = 0.64), but not mold (AUC = 0.54). In models adjusted for confounders, higher average household sizes in census tracts were associated with more reports of pests (cockroaches and rodents). Tax-exempt parcels were associated with more reports of cockroaches in homes. Living in a White-segregated neighborhood was linked with lower reported rodent presence, and mixed residential/commercial housing and newer buildings were associated with more reports of bedroom carpeting/rugs in bedrooms. Conclusions: We innovatively applied a machine learning and causal inference mixture methodology to detail IHEE among children with asthma using EHR and geospatial data, which could have wide applicability and utility.

Idioma originalInglés
Páginas (desde-hasta)38-47
Número de páginas10
PublicaciónAnnals of Epidemiology
Volumen73
DOI
EstadoPublicada - sep. 2022
Publicado de forma externa

Áreas temáticas de ASJC Scopus

  • Epidemiología

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