First description of sarcoptic mange in wild European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

Resultado de la investigación: Article

11 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

The European wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a keystone species in the Iberian Mediterranean ecosystems being the staple prey of protected and endangered predators. Wild rabbits were once widespread, but the introduction of two viral diseases, myxomatosis in the 1950s and the rabbit hemorrhagic disease in 1989, resulted into a dramatic decline of its populations. Sarcoptic mange is a highly contagious parasitic infection caused by Sarcoptes scabiei. The first cases of sarcoptic mange in a wild rabbit population are recorded from a hunting area in Majorca (Balearic Islands, Spain). Five of 32 inspected rabbits (14.7%) were affected, with similar prevalences in summer and autumn. Sarcoptes scabiei were obtained from the edge of the lesions of two of the rabbits. The most frequently observed lesions were small areas of alopecia and crusts in the limbs. Affected limbs presented also a marked hypertrichosis and an apparent abnormal growth of the nails. One rabbit also presented lesions around mouth and nostrils. Parasitized rabbits were in significant lower body condition than healthy ones. According to previous reports of mange epizooties in other naïve wild species that caused marked short-term effects in their populations, this disease may pose a risk for the conservation of wild rabbit and their predators. Whether mange is endemic in rabbits from Majorca or it has been introduced is unknown. Game managers are encouraged to be aware of introducing sarcoptic mange during rabbit translocations.

Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)455-457
Número de páginas3
PublicaciónEuropean Journal of Wildlife Research
Volumen56
N.º3
DOI
EstadoPublished - 1 ene 2010

Huella dactilar

scabies
Oryctolagus cuniculus
lesion
rabbits
limb
predator
viral disease
keystone species
body condition
wild population
translocation
hunting
lesions (animal)
autumn
Sarcoptes scabiei
mange
crust
ecosystem
limbs (animal)
summer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Citar esto

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title = "First description of sarcoptic mange in wild European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)",
abstract = "The European wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a keystone species in the Iberian Mediterranean ecosystems being the staple prey of protected and endangered predators. Wild rabbits were once widespread, but the introduction of two viral diseases, myxomatosis in the 1950s and the rabbit hemorrhagic disease in 1989, resulted into a dramatic decline of its populations. Sarcoptic mange is a highly contagious parasitic infection caused by Sarcoptes scabiei. The first cases of sarcoptic mange in a wild rabbit population are recorded from a hunting area in Majorca (Balearic Islands, Spain). Five of 32 inspected rabbits (14.7{\%}) were affected, with similar prevalences in summer and autumn. Sarcoptes scabiei were obtained from the edge of the lesions of two of the rabbits. The most frequently observed lesions were small areas of alopecia and crusts in the limbs. Affected limbs presented also a marked hypertrichosis and an apparent abnormal growth of the nails. One rabbit also presented lesions around mouth and nostrils. Parasitized rabbits were in significant lower body condition than healthy ones. According to previous reports of mange epizooties in other na{\"i}ve wild species that caused marked short-term effects in their populations, this disease may pose a risk for the conservation of wild rabbit and their predators. Whether mange is endemic in rabbits from Majorca or it has been introduced is unknown. Game managers are encouraged to be aware of introducing sarcoptic mange during rabbit translocations.",
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AB - The European wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a keystone species in the Iberian Mediterranean ecosystems being the staple prey of protected and endangered predators. Wild rabbits were once widespread, but the introduction of two viral diseases, myxomatosis in the 1950s and the rabbit hemorrhagic disease in 1989, resulted into a dramatic decline of its populations. Sarcoptic mange is a highly contagious parasitic infection caused by Sarcoptes scabiei. The first cases of sarcoptic mange in a wild rabbit population are recorded from a hunting area in Majorca (Balearic Islands, Spain). Five of 32 inspected rabbits (14.7%) were affected, with similar prevalences in summer and autumn. Sarcoptes scabiei were obtained from the edge of the lesions of two of the rabbits. The most frequently observed lesions were small areas of alopecia and crusts in the limbs. Affected limbs presented also a marked hypertrichosis and an apparent abnormal growth of the nails. One rabbit also presented lesions around mouth and nostrils. Parasitized rabbits were in significant lower body condition than healthy ones. According to previous reports of mange epizooties in other naïve wild species that caused marked short-term effects in their populations, this disease may pose a risk for the conservation of wild rabbit and their predators. Whether mange is endemic in rabbits from Majorca or it has been introduced is unknown. Game managers are encouraged to be aware of introducing sarcoptic mange during rabbit translocations.

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