First assessment of persistent organic pollutant contamination in blubber of Chilean blue whales from Isla de Chiloé southern Chile

J. Muñoz-Arnanz, A. D. Chirife, B. Galletti Vernazzani, E. Cabrera, M. Sironi, J. Millán, C. R.M. Attard, B. Jiménez

Resultado de la investigación: Article

Resumen

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were assessed for the first time in blue whales from the South Pacific Ocean. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its main metabolites (DDTs), were determined in 40 blubber samples from 36 free-ranging individuals and one stranded, dead animal along the coast of southern Chile between 2011 and 2013. PCBs were the most abundant pollutants (2.97–975 ng/g l.w.), followed by DDTs (3.50–537 ng/g l.w.), HCB (nd–77.5 ng/g l.w.) and PBDEs (nd–33.4 ng/g l.w). There was evidence of differences between sexes, with lower loads in females potentially due to pollutants passing to calves. POP concentrations were higher in specimens sampled in 2013; yet, between-year differences were only statistically significant for HCB and PBDEs. Lower chlorinated (penta > tetra > tri) and brominated (tetra > tri) congeners were the most prevalent among PCBs and PBDEs, respectively, mostly in agreement with findings previously reported in blue and other baleen whales. The present study provides evidence of lower levels of contamination by POPs in eastern South Pacific blue whales in comparison to those reported for the Northern Hemisphere.

Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)1521-1528
Número de páginas8
PublicaciónScience of the Total Environment
Volumen650
DOI
EstadoPublished - 10 feb 2019

Huella dactilar

Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers
Organic pollutants
PBDE
Hexachlorobenzene
whale
Ethers
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
hexachlorobenzene
Contamination
Polychlorinated biphenyls
DDT
PCB
pollutant
Metabolites
Coastal zones
metabolite
Northern Hemisphere
Animals
persistent organic pollutant
contamination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Citar esto

Muñoz-Arnanz, J. ; Chirife, A. D. ; Galletti Vernazzani, B. ; Cabrera, E. ; Sironi, M. ; Millán, J. ; Attard, C. R.M. ; Jiménez, B. / First assessment of persistent organic pollutant contamination in blubber of Chilean blue whales from Isla de Chiloé southern Chile. En: Science of the Total Environment. 2019 ; Vol. 650. pp. 1521-1528.
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First assessment of persistent organic pollutant contamination in blubber of Chilean blue whales from Isla de Chiloé southern Chile. / Muñoz-Arnanz, J.; Chirife, A. D.; Galletti Vernazzani, B.; Cabrera, E.; Sironi, M.; Millán, J.; Attard, C. R.M.; Jiménez, B.

En: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 650, 10.02.2019, p. 1521-1528.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

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T1 - First assessment of persistent organic pollutant contamination in blubber of Chilean blue whales from Isla de Chiloé southern Chile

AU - Muñoz-Arnanz, J.

AU - Chirife, A. D.

AU - Galletti Vernazzani, B.

AU - Cabrera, E.

AU - Sironi, M.

AU - Millán, J.

AU - Attard, C. R.M.

AU - Jiménez, B.

PY - 2019/2/10

Y1 - 2019/2/10

N2 - Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were assessed for the first time in blue whales from the South Pacific Ocean. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its main metabolites (DDTs), were determined in 40 blubber samples from 36 free-ranging individuals and one stranded, dead animal along the coast of southern Chile between 2011 and 2013. PCBs were the most abundant pollutants (2.97–975 ng/g l.w.), followed by DDTs (3.50–537 ng/g l.w.), HCB (nd–77.5 ng/g l.w.) and PBDEs (nd–33.4 ng/g l.w). There was evidence of differences between sexes, with lower loads in females potentially due to pollutants passing to calves. POP concentrations were higher in specimens sampled in 2013; yet, between-year differences were only statistically significant for HCB and PBDEs. Lower chlorinated (penta > tetra > tri) and brominated (tetra > tri) congeners were the most prevalent among PCBs and PBDEs, respectively, mostly in agreement with findings previously reported in blue and other baleen whales. The present study provides evidence of lower levels of contamination by POPs in eastern South Pacific blue whales in comparison to those reported for the Northern Hemisphere.

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KW - DDTs

KW - PBDEs

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