Ecological approaches in veterinary epidemiology: mapping the risk of bat-borne rabies using vegetation indices and night-time light satellite imagery

Luis E. Escobar, A. Townsend Peterson, Monica Papeş, Myriam Favi, Veronica Yung, Olivier Restif, Huijie Qiao, Gonzalo Medina-Vogel

Resultado de la investigación: Article

11 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Rabies remains a disease of significant public health concern. In the Americas, bats are an important source of rabies for pets, livestock, and humans. For effective rabies control and prevention, identifying potential areas for disease occurrence is critical to guide future research, inform public health policies, and design interventions. To anticipate zoonotic infectious diseases distribution at coarse scale, veterinary epidemiology needs to advance via exploring current geographic ecology tools and data using a biological approach. We analyzed bat-borne rabies reports in Chile from 2002 to 2012 to establish associations between rabies occurrence and environmental factors to generate an ecological niche model (ENM). The main rabies reservoir in Chile is the bat species Tadarida brasiliensis; we mapped 726 occurrences of rabies virus variant AgV4 in this bat species and integrated them with contemporary Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The correct prediction of areas with rabies in bats and the reliable anticipation of human rabies in our study illustrate the usefulness of ENM for mapping rabies and other zoonotic pathogens. Additionally, we highlight critical issues with selection of environmental variables, methods for model validation, and consideration of sampling bias. Indeed, models with weak or incorrect validation approaches should be interpreted with caution. In conclusion, ecological niche modeling applications for mapping disease risk at coarse geographic scales have a promising future, especially with refinement and enrichment of models with additional information, such as night-time light data, which increased substantially the model's ability to anticipate human rabies.

Idioma originalEnglish
Número de artículo235
PublicaciónVeterinary Research
Volumen46
N.º1
DOI
EstadoPublished - 1 dic 2015

Huella dactilar

Satellite Imagery
Rabies
rabies
Chiroptera
epidemiology
Epidemiology
Light
niches
Chile
Zoonoses
public health
Public Health
vegetation index
Tadarida
Rabies virus
health policy
environmental factors
disease occurrence
Selection Bias
public policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Citar esto

Escobar, Luis E. ; Peterson, A. Townsend ; Papeş, Monica ; Favi, Myriam ; Yung, Veronica ; Restif, Olivier ; Qiao, Huijie ; Medina-Vogel, Gonzalo. / Ecological approaches in veterinary epidemiology : mapping the risk of bat-borne rabies using vegetation indices and night-time light satellite imagery. En: Veterinary Research. 2015 ; Vol. 46, N.º 1.
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Ecological approaches in veterinary epidemiology : mapping the risk of bat-borne rabies using vegetation indices and night-time light satellite imagery. / Escobar, Luis E.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Papeş, Monica; Favi, Myriam; Yung, Veronica; Restif, Olivier; Qiao, Huijie; Medina-Vogel, Gonzalo.

En: Veterinary Research, Vol. 46, N.º 1, 235, 01.12.2015.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

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AU - Peterson, A. Townsend

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