Dog bite prevention: Effect of a short educational intervention for preschool children

Nelly Lakestani, Morag L. Donaldson

Resultado de la investigación: Article

18 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

This study aimed to investigate whether preschool children can learn how to interpret dogs' behaviours, with the purpose of helping avoid dog bites. Three- to five-year-old children (N = 70) were tested on their ability to answer questions about dogs' emotional states before and after participating in either an educational intervention about dog behaviour (intervention group) or an activity about wild animals (control group). Children who had received training about dog behaviour (intervention group) were significantly better at judging the dogs' emotional states after the intervention compared to before. The frequency with which they referred to relevant behaviours in justifying their judgements also increased significantly. In contrast, the control group's performance did not differ significantly between the two testing times. These results indicate that preschool children can be taught how to correctly interpret dogs' behaviours. This implies that incorporating such training into prevention programmes may contribute to reducing dog bite incidents.

Idioma originalEnglish
Número de artículoe0134319
PublicaciónPLoS ONE
Volumen10
N.º8
DOI
EstadoPublished - 19 ago 2015
Publicado de forma externa

Huella dactilar

preschool children
Preschool Children
Bites and Stings
Dogs
dogs
Animals
Testing
Control Groups
Aptitude
Wild Animals
wild animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Citar esto

Lakestani, Nelly ; Donaldson, Morag L. / Dog bite prevention : Effect of a short educational intervention for preschool children. En: PLoS ONE. 2015 ; Vol. 10, N.º 8.
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Dog bite prevention : Effect of a short educational intervention for preschool children. / Lakestani, Nelly; Donaldson, Morag L.

En: PLoS ONE, Vol. 10, N.º 8, e0134319, 19.08.2015.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

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