Covid‐related concerns, the need for help, and perceived microaggression among young ultra‐orthodox jewish respondents in Israel

Faiga Weiden, Michal Levinsky, Miriam Schiff, Nati Becker, Ruth Pat‐horenczyk, Rami Benbenishty

Resultado de la investigación: Contribución a una revistaArtículorevisión exhaustiva

Resumen

Minority groups are especially vulnerable to the negative psychological and economic consequences of the COVID‐19 pandemic. This study focused on one prominent minority group in Israel: ultra‐Orthodox Jews. It examined the rate of exposure to COVID‐19, adherence to COVID‐19 mitigation guidelines, difficulties with adherence to COVID‐19 guidelines, COVID‐related concerns, financial hardships, the need for help, and microaggression during the first wave of the pandemic (April– May 2020). It then examined multivariate prediction of COVID‐related concerns, the need for help, and microaggression. The sample comprised 252 respondents, with 67% female and a mean age of 32.85 (SD = 10.63). Results showed that 78.8% of the participants knew at least one person who had tested positive for COVID‐19, and 31.4% knew at least one person who had passed away from COVID‐ 19. Only 59.7% of the participants reported high adherence to social distancing guidelines. Perceived microaggression was predicted by the difficulties with adherence to COVID‐19 guidelines, the level of stress associated with exposure to the media, and financial hardships. The study’s implications point to the centrality of perceived microaggression and the necessity of adopting culturally sensitive approaches to engage minorities in public efforts to fight the spread of viruses.

Idioma originalInglés
Número de artículo6445
PublicaciónInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volumen18
N.º12
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 2 jun 2021

Áreas temáticas de ASJC Scopus

  • Contaminación
  • Salud pública, medioambiental y laboral
  • Salud, toxicología y mutagénesis

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