Assessing marine gas emission activity and contribution to the atmospheric methane inventory: A multidisciplinary approach from the Dutch Dogger Bank seep area (North Sea)

M. Römer, S. Wenau, S. Mau, M. Veloso, J. Greinert, M. Schlüter, G. Bohrmann

Resultado de la investigación: Article

10 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

We present a comprehensive study showing new results from a shallow gas seep area in ∼40 m water depth located in the North Sea, Netherlands sector B13 that we call “Dutch Dogger Bank seep area.” It has been postulated that methane presumably originating from a gas reservoir in ∼600 m depth below the seafloor is naturally leaking to the seafloor. Our ship-based subbottom echosounder data indicate that the migrating gas is trapped in numerous gas pockets in the shallow sediments. The gas pockets are located at the boundary between the top of the Late Pliocene section and overlying fine-grained sediments, which were deposited during the early Holocene marine transgression after the last glaciation. We mapped gas emissions during three R/V Heincke cruises in 2014, 2015, and 2016 and repeatedly observed up to 850 flares in the study area. Most of them (∼80%) were concentrated at five flare clusters. Our repeated analysis revealed spatial similarities of seep clusters, but also heterogeneities in emission intensities. A first calculation of the methane released from these clusters into the water column revealed a flow rate of 277 L/min (SD = 140), with two clusters emitting 132 and 142 L/min representing the most significant seepage sites. Above these two flare clusters, elevated methane concentrations were recorded in atmospheric measurements. Our results illustrate the effective transport of methane via gas bubbles through a ∼40 m water column, and furthermore provide an estimate of the emission rate needed to allow for a contribution to the atmospheric methane concentration.

Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)2617-2633
Número de páginas17
PublicaciónGeochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems
Volumen18
N.º7
DOI
EstadoPublished - 1 ene 2017

Huella dactilar

North Sea
Methane
Gas emissions
methane
Gases
gas pockets
flares
gases
gas
sediments
Water
Sediments
seafloor
seepage
water column
water depth
Netherlands
ships
last glaciation
water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Citar esto

Römer, M. ; Wenau, S. ; Mau, S. ; Veloso, M. ; Greinert, J. ; Schlüter, M. ; Bohrmann, G. / Assessing marine gas emission activity and contribution to the atmospheric methane inventory : A multidisciplinary approach from the Dutch Dogger Bank seep area (North Sea). En: Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems. 2017 ; Vol. 18, N.º 7. pp. 2617-2633.
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Assessing marine gas emission activity and contribution to the atmospheric methane inventory : A multidisciplinary approach from the Dutch Dogger Bank seep area (North Sea). / Römer, M.; Wenau, S.; Mau, S.; Veloso, M.; Greinert, J.; Schlüter, M.; Bohrmann, G.

En: Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 18, N.º 7, 01.01.2017, p. 2617-2633.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing marine gas emission activity and contribution to the atmospheric methane inventory

T2 - A multidisciplinary approach from the Dutch Dogger Bank seep area (North Sea)

AU - Römer, M.

AU - Wenau, S.

AU - Mau, S.

AU - Veloso, M.

AU - Greinert, J.

AU - Schlüter, M.

AU - Bohrmann, G.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - We present a comprehensive study showing new results from a shallow gas seep area in ∼40 m water depth located in the North Sea, Netherlands sector B13 that we call “Dutch Dogger Bank seep area.” It has been postulated that methane presumably originating from a gas reservoir in ∼600 m depth below the seafloor is naturally leaking to the seafloor. Our ship-based subbottom echosounder data indicate that the migrating gas is trapped in numerous gas pockets in the shallow sediments. The gas pockets are located at the boundary between the top of the Late Pliocene section and overlying fine-grained sediments, which were deposited during the early Holocene marine transgression after the last glaciation. We mapped gas emissions during three R/V Heincke cruises in 2014, 2015, and 2016 and repeatedly observed up to 850 flares in the study area. Most of them (∼80%) were concentrated at five flare clusters. Our repeated analysis revealed spatial similarities of seep clusters, but also heterogeneities in emission intensities. A first calculation of the methane released from these clusters into the water column revealed a flow rate of 277 L/min (SD = 140), with two clusters emitting 132 and 142 L/min representing the most significant seepage sites. Above these two flare clusters, elevated methane concentrations were recorded in atmospheric measurements. Our results illustrate the effective transport of methane via gas bubbles through a ∼40 m water column, and furthermore provide an estimate of the emission rate needed to allow for a contribution to the atmospheric methane concentration.

AB - We present a comprehensive study showing new results from a shallow gas seep area in ∼40 m water depth located in the North Sea, Netherlands sector B13 that we call “Dutch Dogger Bank seep area.” It has been postulated that methane presumably originating from a gas reservoir in ∼600 m depth below the seafloor is naturally leaking to the seafloor. Our ship-based subbottom echosounder data indicate that the migrating gas is trapped in numerous gas pockets in the shallow sediments. The gas pockets are located at the boundary between the top of the Late Pliocene section and overlying fine-grained sediments, which were deposited during the early Holocene marine transgression after the last glaciation. We mapped gas emissions during three R/V Heincke cruises in 2014, 2015, and 2016 and repeatedly observed up to 850 flares in the study area. Most of them (∼80%) were concentrated at five flare clusters. Our repeated analysis revealed spatial similarities of seep clusters, but also heterogeneities in emission intensities. A first calculation of the methane released from these clusters into the water column revealed a flow rate of 277 L/min (SD = 140), with two clusters emitting 132 and 142 L/min representing the most significant seepage sites. Above these two flare clusters, elevated methane concentrations were recorded in atmospheric measurements. Our results illustrate the effective transport of methane via gas bubbles through a ∼40 m water column, and furthermore provide an estimate of the emission rate needed to allow for a contribution to the atmospheric methane concentration.

KW - atmospheric CH input

KW - Dogger Bank

KW - flare cluster

KW - methane bubble emission

KW - subseafloor gas accumulation

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U2 - 10.1002/2017GC006995

DO - 10.1002/2017GC006995

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85030232054

VL - 18

SP - 2617

EP - 2633

JO - Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems

JF - Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems

SN - 1525-2027

IS - 7

ER -