Are degraded habitats from agricultural crops associated with elevated faecal glucocorticoids in a wild population of common vole (Microtus arvalis)?

Álvaro Navarro-Castilla, Isabel Barja, Pedro P. Olea, Ana Piñeiro, Patricia Mateo-Tomás, Gema Silván, Juan Carlos Illera

Resultado de la investigación: Article

22 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

The severe impact of agriculture on species' abundance and diversity is widely recognized. However, its effects on the physiology of wild animal populations are poorly known. We analyzed faecal glucocorticoids levels in wild common voles (Microtus arvalis) living in a farmland landscape to test whether living in degraded habitats, such as crops, is correlated with increased glucocorticoids. Other factors such as sex, reproductive status, and population density were also considered. We captured voles with Sherman traps in crops and in their field margins which were comprised of semi-natural vegetation. We collected fresh faecal samples from captured individuals and quantified their levels of faecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in the laboratory. The quantification of FCM concentrations was performed by competitive enzyme immunoassay. Individuals captured within the crops had higher levels of FCM than those in field margins; females and breeding individuals exhibited higher FCM levels. In addition, FCM concentrations positively correlated with abundance of voles. Our results suggest that degraded habitats in agricultural landscapes are associated with increased glucocorticoid levels on common voles likely caused by a higher disturbance from agricultural practices and a lesser vegetation cover in crops compared with field margins.

Idioma originalEnglish
Páginas (desde-hasta)36-43
Número de páginas8
PublicaciónMammalian Biology
Volumen79
N.º1
DOI
EstadoPublished - 1 ene 2014

Huella dactilar

Microtus arvalis
corticosterone
glucocorticoids
wild population
metabolite
field margin
metabolites
crop
edge effects
habitat
crops
habitats
agricultural land
trap crops
reproductive status
immunoassay
enzyme immunoassays
wild animals
cover crops
agricultural practice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Citar esto

Navarro-Castilla, Álvaro ; Barja, Isabel ; Olea, Pedro P. ; Piñeiro, Ana ; Mateo-Tomás, Patricia ; Silván, Gema ; Illera, Juan Carlos. / Are degraded habitats from agricultural crops associated with elevated faecal glucocorticoids in a wild population of common vole (Microtus arvalis)?. En: Mammalian Biology. 2014 ; Vol. 79, N.º 1. pp. 36-43.
@article{a9c5d77de728419aa72f78e41ef27469,
title = "Are degraded habitats from agricultural crops associated with elevated faecal glucocorticoids in a wild population of common vole (Microtus arvalis)?",
abstract = "The severe impact of agriculture on species' abundance and diversity is widely recognized. However, its effects on the physiology of wild animal populations are poorly known. We analyzed faecal glucocorticoids levels in wild common voles (Microtus arvalis) living in a farmland landscape to test whether living in degraded habitats, such as crops, is correlated with increased glucocorticoids. Other factors such as sex, reproductive status, and population density were also considered. We captured voles with Sherman traps in crops and in their field margins which were comprised of semi-natural vegetation. We collected fresh faecal samples from captured individuals and quantified their levels of faecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in the laboratory. The quantification of FCM concentrations was performed by competitive enzyme immunoassay. Individuals captured within the crops had higher levels of FCM than those in field margins; females and breeding individuals exhibited higher FCM levels. In addition, FCM concentrations positively correlated with abundance of voles. Our results suggest that degraded habitats in agricultural landscapes are associated with increased glucocorticoid levels on common voles likely caused by a higher disturbance from agricultural practices and a lesser vegetation cover in crops compared with field margins.",
keywords = "Anthropogenic disturbance, Faecal corticosterone metabolites, Field margins, Managed landscapes, Small mammals",
author = "{\'A}lvaro Navarro-Castilla and Isabel Barja and Olea, {Pedro P.} and Ana Pi{\~n}eiro and Patricia Mateo-Tom{\'a}s and Gema Silv{\'a}n and Illera, {Juan Carlos}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.mambio.2013.08.004",
language = "English",
volume = "79",
pages = "36--43",
journal = "Mammalian Biology",
issn = "1616-5047",
publisher = "Urban und Fischer Verlag Jena",
number = "1",

}

Are degraded habitats from agricultural crops associated with elevated faecal glucocorticoids in a wild population of common vole (Microtus arvalis)? / Navarro-Castilla, Álvaro; Barja, Isabel; Olea, Pedro P.; Piñeiro, Ana; Mateo-Tomás, Patricia; Silván, Gema; Illera, Juan Carlos.

En: Mammalian Biology, Vol. 79, N.º 1, 01.01.2014, p. 36-43.

Resultado de la investigación: Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are degraded habitats from agricultural crops associated with elevated faecal glucocorticoids in a wild population of common vole (Microtus arvalis)?

AU - Navarro-Castilla, Álvaro

AU - Barja, Isabel

AU - Olea, Pedro P.

AU - Piñeiro, Ana

AU - Mateo-Tomás, Patricia

AU - Silván, Gema

AU - Illera, Juan Carlos

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - The severe impact of agriculture on species' abundance and diversity is widely recognized. However, its effects on the physiology of wild animal populations are poorly known. We analyzed faecal glucocorticoids levels in wild common voles (Microtus arvalis) living in a farmland landscape to test whether living in degraded habitats, such as crops, is correlated with increased glucocorticoids. Other factors such as sex, reproductive status, and population density were also considered. We captured voles with Sherman traps in crops and in their field margins which were comprised of semi-natural vegetation. We collected fresh faecal samples from captured individuals and quantified their levels of faecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in the laboratory. The quantification of FCM concentrations was performed by competitive enzyme immunoassay. Individuals captured within the crops had higher levels of FCM than those in field margins; females and breeding individuals exhibited higher FCM levels. In addition, FCM concentrations positively correlated with abundance of voles. Our results suggest that degraded habitats in agricultural landscapes are associated with increased glucocorticoid levels on common voles likely caused by a higher disturbance from agricultural practices and a lesser vegetation cover in crops compared with field margins.

AB - The severe impact of agriculture on species' abundance and diversity is widely recognized. However, its effects on the physiology of wild animal populations are poorly known. We analyzed faecal glucocorticoids levels in wild common voles (Microtus arvalis) living in a farmland landscape to test whether living in degraded habitats, such as crops, is correlated with increased glucocorticoids. Other factors such as sex, reproductive status, and population density were also considered. We captured voles with Sherman traps in crops and in their field margins which were comprised of semi-natural vegetation. We collected fresh faecal samples from captured individuals and quantified their levels of faecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in the laboratory. The quantification of FCM concentrations was performed by competitive enzyme immunoassay. Individuals captured within the crops had higher levels of FCM than those in field margins; females and breeding individuals exhibited higher FCM levels. In addition, FCM concentrations positively correlated with abundance of voles. Our results suggest that degraded habitats in agricultural landscapes are associated with increased glucocorticoid levels on common voles likely caused by a higher disturbance from agricultural practices and a lesser vegetation cover in crops compared with field margins.

KW - Anthropogenic disturbance

KW - Faecal corticosterone metabolites

KW - Field margins

KW - Managed landscapes

KW - Small mammals

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84888199841&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.mambio.2013.08.004

DO - 10.1016/j.mambio.2013.08.004

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84888199841

VL - 79

SP - 36

EP - 43

JO - Mammalian Biology

JF - Mammalian Biology

SN - 1616-5047

IS - 1

ER -