Visual and phonological coding in working memory and orthographic skills of deaf children using chilean sign language

Jesús M. Alvarado, Aníbal Puente, Valeria Herrera

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    24 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Deaf children can improve their reading skills by learning to use alternative, visual codes such as fingerspelling. A sample of 28 deaf children between the ages of 7 and 16 years was used as an experimental group and another sample of 15 hearing children of similar age and academic level as a control group. Two experiments were carried out to study the possible interactions between phonological and visual codes and working memory, and to understand the relationships between these codes and reading and orthographic achievement. The results highlight the relationship between dactylic and orthographic coding. Just as phoneme-to-grapheme knowledge can facilitate reading for hearing children, fingerspelling-to-grapheme knowledge has the potential to play a similar role for deaf readers.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)467-479
    Number of pages13
    JournalAmerican Annals of the Deaf
    Volume152
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Education
    • Developmental and Educational Psychology
    • Speech and Hearing

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