The Type VI Secretion System Encoded in SPI-6 Plays a Role in Gastrointestinal Colonization and Systemic Spread of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Chicken

David Pezoa, Hee Jeong Yang, Carlos J. Blondel, Carlos A. Santiviago, Helene L. Andrews-Polymenis, Inés Contreras

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPIs) in pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium infection in the chicken is poorly studied, while many studies have been completed in murine models. The Type VI Secretion System (T6SS) is a recently described protein secretion system in Gram-negative bacteria. The genus Salmonella contains five phylogenetically distinct T6SS encoded in differentially distributed genomic islands. S. Typhimurium harbors a T6SS encoded in SPI-6 (T6SSSPI-6), which contributes to the ability of Salmonella to colonize mice. On the other hand, serotype Gallinarum harbors a T6SS encoded in SPI-19 (T6SSSPI-19) that is required for colonization of chicks. In this work, we investigated the role of T6SSSPI-6 in infection of chicks by S. Typhimurium. Oral infection of White Leghorn chicks showed that a ΔT6SSSPI-6 mutant had reduced colonization of the gut and internal organs, compared with the wild-type strain. Transfer of the intact T6SSSPI-6 gene cluster into the T6SS mutant restored bacterial colonization. In addition, our results showed that transfer of T6SSSPI-19 from S. Gallinarum to the ΔT6SSSPI-6 mutant of S. Typhimurium not only complemented the colonization defect but also resulted in a transient increase in the colonization of the cecum and ileum of chicks at days 1 and 3 post-infection. Our data indicates that T6SSSPI-6 contributes to chicken colonization and suggests that both T6SSSPI-6 and T6SSSPI-19 perform similar functions in vivo despite belonging to different phylogenetic families.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere63917
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 May 2013

Fingerprint

pathogenicity islands
Genomic Islands
Salmonella
Salmonella enterica
Salmonella Typhimurium
Chickens
chickens
chicks
Infection
infection
mutants
Ports and harbors
genomic islands
bacterial colonization
protein secretion
Cecum
Salmonella typhimurium
White Leghorn
Multigene Family
Gram-Negative Bacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Pezoa, David ; Yang, Hee Jeong ; Blondel, Carlos J. ; Santiviago, Carlos A. ; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L. ; Contreras, Inés. / The Type VI Secretion System Encoded in SPI-6 Plays a Role in Gastrointestinal Colonization and Systemic Spread of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Chicken. In: PLoS ONE. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 5.
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abstract = "The role of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPIs) in pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium infection in the chicken is poorly studied, while many studies have been completed in murine models. The Type VI Secretion System (T6SS) is a recently described protein secretion system in Gram-negative bacteria. The genus Salmonella contains five phylogenetically distinct T6SS encoded in differentially distributed genomic islands. S. Typhimurium harbors a T6SS encoded in SPI-6 (T6SSSPI-6), which contributes to the ability of Salmonella to colonize mice. On the other hand, serotype Gallinarum harbors a T6SS encoded in SPI-19 (T6SSSPI-19) that is required for colonization of chicks. In this work, we investigated the role of T6SSSPI-6 in infection of chicks by S. Typhimurium. Oral infection of White Leghorn chicks showed that a ΔT6SSSPI-6 mutant had reduced colonization of the gut and internal organs, compared with the wild-type strain. Transfer of the intact T6SSSPI-6 gene cluster into the T6SS mutant restored bacterial colonization. In addition, our results showed that transfer of T6SSSPI-19 from S. Gallinarum to the ΔT6SSSPI-6 mutant of S. Typhimurium not only complemented the colonization defect but also resulted in a transient increase in the colonization of the cecum and ileum of chicks at days 1 and 3 post-infection. Our data indicates that T6SSSPI-6 contributes to chicken colonization and suggests that both T6SSSPI-6 and T6SSSPI-19 perform similar functions in vivo despite belonging to different phylogenetic families.",
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The Type VI Secretion System Encoded in SPI-6 Plays a Role in Gastrointestinal Colonization and Systemic Spread of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Chicken. / Pezoa, David; Yang, Hee Jeong; Blondel, Carlos J.; Santiviago, Carlos A.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Contreras, Inés.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 8, No. 5, e63917, 14.05.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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