The capacity of Salmonella to survive inside dendritic cells and prevent antigen presentation to T cells is host specific

Susan M. Bueno, Pablo A. González, Leandro J. Carreño, Jaime A. Tobar, Guido C. Mora, Cristian J. Pereda, Flavio Salazar-Onfray, Alexis M. Kalergis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) causes a severe and lethal systemic disease in mice, characterized by poor activation of the adaptive immune response against Salmonella-derived antigens. Recently, we and others have reported that this feature relies on the ability of S. Typhimurium to survive within murine dendritic cells (DCs) and avoid the presentation of bacteria-derived antigens to T cells. In contrast, here we show that infection of murine DCs with either S. Typhi or S. Enteritidis, two serovars adapted to different hosts, leads to an efficient T-cell activation both in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis failed to replicate within murine DCs and were quickly degraded, allowing T-cell activation. In contrast, human DCs were found to be permissive for survival and proliferation of S. Typhi, but not for S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis. Our data suggest that Salmonella host restriction is characterized by the ability of these bacteria to survive within DCs and avoid activation of the adaptive immune response in their specific hosts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)522-533
Number of pages12
JournalImmunology
Volume124
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008

Keywords

  • Dendritic cells
  • Host restriction
  • Salmonella
  • T cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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