Subjective well-being and its intrinsic and extrinsic motivational correlates in high performance executives: A study in Chilean managers empirically revisiting the bifactor model

Daniela Pradenas, Juan Carlos Oyanedel, Silvia da Costa, Andrés Rubio, Dario Páez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study analyzes the relationship between work satisfaction, family satisfaction, and general well-being in high performance managers in Santiago, Chile. The importance of the satisfaction of intrinsic and extrinsic needs and motivations was examined to advance in the development of a positive organizational psychology, which investigates the factors that reinforce well-being. Seventy-five executives from large and medium-sized companies were surveyed and 8 in-depth interviews were carried out. The main predictors of well-being are, from family satisfaction, the family’s ability to cope with stress and, from work satisfaction, extrinsic aspects such as material conditions of the job and stability, and intrinsic aspects such as recognition and the ability to organize one’s own work. The more general regression model shows that extrinsic job and family satisfaction predict general well-being, not intrinsic satisfaction. The results are discussed in the framework of classical models of motivation, such as Herzberg’s, their relationship to Deci and Ryan’s self-determination theory, and the current study of well-being in organizations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8082
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume18
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Extrinsic motivation
  • Intrinsic motivation
  • Well-being
  • Work satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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