Risk factors associated with faecal carriage of extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli among dogs in Southeast Brazil

Marília Salgado-Caxito, Julio A. Benavides, Jose M. Munita, Lina Rivas, Patricia García, Fernando J.P. Listoni, Andrea I. Moreno-Switt, Antonio C. Paes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Faecal carriage of extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (ESC-R E. coli) in dogs has been reported worldwide and can reduce the effectiveness of treatments against bacterial infections. However, the drivers that influence faecal carriage of ESC-R E. coli in dogs are poorly understood. The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of ESC-R E. coli among dogs prior to their admission to a veterinary teaching hospital and to identify risk factors associated with the faecal carriage of ESC-R E. coli. Rectal swabs (n = 130) were collected from dogs and screened for ESC-R E. coli using MacConkey agar supplemented with cefotaxime (2 μg/mL). E. coli species was confirmed by MALDI-TOF and screening of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) genes was conducted by multiplex PCR. Questionnaires were completed by each dog's owner to test several human and dog characteristics associated with ESC-R E. coli. The prevalence of faecal carriage of ESC-R E. coli was 9.2 % and 67 % of ESC-R E. coli isolates harboured ESBL genes including CTX-M alone or in combination with TEM. All ESC-R E. coli isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone, cefpodoxime, and cefotaxime and were susceptible to cefoxitin and carbapenems. The likelihood of carrying ESC-R E. coli was 15 times higher (OR = 14.41 [95 % CI: 1.80−38.02], p < 0.01) if the dog was treated with antibiotics 3–12 months prior to sampling and 8 times higher (OR = 7.96 [95 % CI: 2.96−92.07], p < 0.01) if the dog had direct contact with livestock, but 15 times lower (OR = 0.07 [95 % CI: 0.01−0.32], p < 0.01) if the dog was dewormed during the previous year. Our findings confirm the faecal carriage of ESC-R E. coli in subclinical dogs and call for further investigation regarding the impact of deworming on antibiotic-resistant bacteria in companion animals.

Original languageEnglish
Article number105316
JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume190
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2021

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Companion animals
  • Deworming
  • E. coli
  • Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase
  • Latin America

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Animals
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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