Reliability of trunk strength measurements with an isokinetic dynamometer in non-specific low back pain patients: A systematic review

Waleska Reyes-Ferrada, Luis Chirosa-Rios, Darío Martinez-Garcia, Ángela Rodríguez-Perea, Daniel Jerez-Mayorga

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Imbalance or decreased trunk strength has been associated with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP). OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aimed (I) to evaluate the quality of evidence of studies evaluating the reliability of trunk strength assessment with an isokinetic dynamometer in NSLBP patients, (II) to examine the reliability of trunk strength assessment using an isokinetic dynamometer in NSLBP patients and (III) to determine the most reliable protocol for trunk strength assessment in NSLBP patients. METHOD: PRISMA guidelines were followed. Three databases were used: PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science with the following keywords: Isokinetic, Dynamometer, Trunk strength testing, Muscle testing, Isokinetic measurement, CORE, Abdominal muscles, Abdominal wall, Torso, Trunk, Spine, Reliability and, Reproducibility. We included only test-retest studies, focused on the reliability of isometric and isokinetic strength assessed with an isokinetic dynamometer in NSLBP adults' patients, published in English and from inception to March 30, 2021. The methodological quality was evaluated with the CAT scale and QAREL checklist. RESULTS: Five hundred and seventy-seven articles were retrieved, of which five are included in this review. Three articles provide good quality of evidence, the reliability of trunk strength assessment in NSLBP patients is excellent, and the most reliable protocol for isometric assessment is in a seated position (ICC = 0.94-0.98) and for isokinetic strength in standing position, at 60∘/s and 120∘/s (ICC = 0.98). CONCLUSION: There is good quality evidence regarding the trunk strength assessment's reliability. Reliability is excellent in NSLBP patients; however, a familiarization process should be considered to obtain clinically reliable data. The most reliable protocol is in a seated position for isometric strength and a standing position for isokinetic strength.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)937-948
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Keywords

  • back pain
  • core muscles
  • Reproducibility
  • test re-test
  • torso
  • trunk strength testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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