Priorities for the conservation of the pudu (Pudu puda) in southern South America

Eduardo A. Silva-Rodrguez, O. Alejandro Aleuy, Marcelo Fuentes-Hurtado, Juliana A. Vianna, Fernando Vidal, Jaime E. Jiḿnez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The southern pudu (Pudu puda) is a threatened deer that is endemic to the South American temperate forests. Despite its assumed threatened status, there is relatively little understanding on the ecology and conservation of this species. Considering this situation and the fact that there are some research groups currently working on this species, we organised a symposium to discuss research and management priorities as well as to coordinate efforts to move forward on the conservation of the pudu. We agreed that main research priorities should be to increase the understanding of the threats that jeopardize the viability of pudu populations, with a strong emphasis on research questions that will provide information for the management of these threats. The main management recommendations were to implement monitoring of pudu populations at least in protected areas, to implement specific actions to remove threats from protected areas and to start following internationally-accepted guidelines for the management of rescued and confiscated animals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)375-377
Number of pages3
JournalAnimal Production Science
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Chile
  • conservation status
  • dog
  • forest
  • management
  • southern pudu

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Food Science

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    Silva-Rodrguez, E. A., Aleuy, O. A., Fuentes-Hurtado, M., Vianna, J. A., Vidal, F., & Jiḿnez, J. E. (2011). Priorities for the conservation of the pudu (Pudu puda) in southern South America. Animal Production Science, 51(4), 375-377. https://doi.org/10.1071/AN10286