Lower cretaceous missing volcanic arc. A migrating arc, central Patagonian cordillera, Chile: Detrital zircon U–Pb geochronology

Manuel Suarez, Jean Baptiste Gressier, Pablo Rossel, Rita De la Cruz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

New U–Pb detrital zircon ages from seven samples from the Lower Cretaceous Katterfeld and Apeleg formations and Divisadero Group of Central Patagonia in the Aysén Region of Chile, establish the recognition of a Valanginian to earliest Aptian volcanic episode not identified in the rock record of the region, named herein as the Missing Volcanic Arc (MIVA). The available radiometric ages indicates that the inferred plutonic roots of this Missing Volcanic Arc are restricted to a segment 50-km wide and more that 200-km long exposed along the western side of the Patagonian Batholith, and more than 100 km to the west of the former arc of the previous Upper Jurassic to early Valanginian Ibáñez Formation and related intra-arc basins, supporting a westward migration of the arc. This migration left a subsiding back-arc region where the former Ibáñez Formation volcanic rocks were covered by the younger sediments of the Aysén Basin, a northern sub-basin of the Austral Basin. After approximately 10–11 Ma, during the early Aptian, the arc migrated eastwards, probably due to a shallowing slab, forming the Divisadero Formation and related plutons at approximately the same site of the former Ibáñez arc. Our data also supports a 90 Myr continuous magmatism in western central Patagonian from the Late Jurassic to the Late Cretaceous.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)907-923
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Earth Sciences
Volume112
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2023

Keywords

  • Early Cretaceous
  • Migrating arcs
  • Patagonia
  • Tectonism
  • Volcanism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Earth and Planetary Sciences

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Lower cretaceous missing volcanic arc. A migrating arc, central Patagonian cordillera, Chile: Detrital zircon U–Pb geochronology'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this