Living Historical Memory: Associations with National Identity, Social Dominance Orientation, and System Justification in 40 Countries

James H. Liu, Fouad Bou Zeineddine, Sarah Y. Choi, Robert Jiqi Zhang, Roosevelt Vilar, Dario Páez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Living historical memory (LHM) was assessed amongst representative samples of adults from 40 societies (N = 22,708), who completed online surveys asking them to name three historical events in living memory that have had the greatest impact on their country. Multilevel analyses revealed that the number of LHM nominations was positively but variably related to national identity, with stronger links in developing countries. LHM was consistently and more strongly associated with lower social dominance orientation, and lower system justification. LHM appears to support national identity, especially in developing countries where there is greater need for national progress. While LHM fosters bottom-up aspirations for group-equality universally, it instills critical systemic evaluations in developing countries especially. It appears that LHM in developing countries has progressive functions, contextualizing current disadvantages as being linked to history, but nonetheless drawing from living memories to band people together in positive collective remembrance of the advent of nationhood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104-116
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Collective memory
  • Communicative memory
  • Living historical memory
  • National identity
  • Social dominance orientation
  • System justification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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