Epidemiology and prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in humans, animals and the environment in West and Central Africa

Oumar Ouchar Mahamat, Marie Kempf, Manon Lounnas, Abelsalam Tidjani, Mallorie Hide, Julio A. Benavides, Christian Carrière, Anne Laure Bañuls, Hélène Jean-Pierre, Abdoul Salam Ouedraogo, Yann Dumont, Sylvain Godreuil

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) are widespread. Here we used the ‘One Health’ approach to determine knowledge gaps on ESBL-E and CPE in West and Central Africa. We searched all articles on ESBL-E and CPE in these African regions published in PubMed, African Journals Online and Google Scholar from 2000 onwards. Among the 1201 articles retrieved, we selected 165 studies (West Africa, 118; Central Africa, 47) with data from 22 of the 26 West and Central Africa countries. Regarding the settings, 136 articles focused only on humans (carriage and/or infection), 6 articles on humans and animals, 13 on animals, 1 on humans and the environment, 8 on the environment and 1 on humans, animals and environments. ESBL-E prevalence ranged from 11–72% in humans and 7–79% in aquatic environments (wastewater). In animals, ESBL-E prevalence hugely varied: 0% in cattle, 11–36% in chickens, 20% in rats, 21–71% in pigs and 32–75% in dogs. The blaCTX-M-15 gene was the predominant ESBL-encoding gene and was associated with plasmids of incompatibility groups F, H, K, Y, N, I1 and R. CPE were studied only in humans. Class B metallo-β-lactamases (NDM) and class D oxacillinases (OXA-48 and OXA-181) were the most common carbapenemases. Our results show major knowledge gaps, particularly on ESBL and CPE in animals and the environment, that might limit antimicrobial resistance management in these regions. The results also emphasise the urgent need to improve active surveillance programmes in each country and to support antimicrobial stewardship.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106203
JournalInternational Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Carbapenemase
  • Central and West Africa
  • Data
  • Enterobacteriaceae
  • ESBL
  • Systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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