BOMBOLO: A 3-arms optical imager for SOAR Observatory

Dani Guzmán, Rodolfo Angeloni, Thomas Puzia, Damien Jones, Andrés Jordán, Timo Anguita, Susan Benecchi, Eduardo Garcés

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BOMBOLO is a new multi-passband visitor instrument for the SOAR observatory. It is a three-arm imager covering the near-UV and optical wavelengths. The three arms work simultaneously and independently, providing synchronized imaging capability for rapid astronomical events. BOMBOLO leading science cases are: 1) Simultaneous Multiband Flickering Studies of Accretion Phenomena; 2) Near UV/Optical Diagnostics of Stellar Evolutionary Phases; 3) Exoplanetary Transits; 4) Microlensing Follow-Up and 5) Solar Systems Studies. The instrument is at the Conceptual Design stage, having been approved by the SOAR Board of Directors as a visitor instrument in 2012 and having been granted full funding from CONICYT, the Chilean State Agency of Research, in 2013. The Design Phase has begun and will be completed in late 2014, followed by a construction phase in 2015 and 2016A, with expected Commissioning in 2016B and 2017A.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGround-Based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy V
PublisherSPIE
Volume9147
ISBN (Electronic)9780819496157
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventGround-Based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy V - Montreal, Canada
Duration: 22 Jun 201426 Jun 2014

Other

OtherGround-Based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy V
Country/TerritoryCanada
CityMontreal
Period22/06/1426/06/14

Keywords

  • muti-passband optical imaging
  • rapid photometry
  • time-series astronomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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