A time series of prokaryote secondary production in the oxygen minimum zone of the Humboldt current system, off central Chile

H. A. Levipan, R. A. Quiñones, H. Urrutia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because the marine picoplanktonic communities are made up of phylogenetically different microbial groups, the re-evaluation of key processes such as bacterial secondary production (BSP) has become an important contemporary issue. The difficulty of differentiating the metabolic processes of Bacteria from the rest of the microorganisms in the water column (i.e., Archaea and Eukarya) has made it difficult to estimate in situ BSP. This work presents the seasonal variability of the prokaryote secondary production (PSP) measured by the incorporation of 14C-leucine in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off central-southern Chile. The BSP and potential archaeal secondary production (PASP) were determined through the combined use of 14C-leucine and N1-guanyl-1, 7-diaminoheptane (GC7), an efficient inhibitor of archaeal and eukaryote cell growth. BSP accounted for the majority of the PSP (total average, 59 ± 7.5%); maximum values were ∼600 μg C m-3 h-1 and, on several dates, BSP represented 100% of the PSP. Similarly, PASP was also an important fraction of the PSP (total average, 42.4 ± 8.5%), although with levels that ranged from not detectable (on given dates) to levels that represented up to ∼97% of PSP (winter 2003). Our results showed that both Bacteria and Archaea accounted for almost equal portions of the prokaryote heterotrophic metabolism in the OMZ, and that PASP is notoriously enhanced through temporal pulses of heterotrophy. This indicates that, at least in marine systems with high abundance of Archaea (e.g., mesopelagic realm), the secondary production obtained through methods measuring the uptake of radiolabeled substrates should be considered as PSP and not as BSP. If the latter is the target measurement, then the use of an inhibitor of both archaeal and eukaryote cell growth such as GC7 is recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)531-549
Number of pages19
JournalProgress in Oceanography
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

Keywords

  • Bacterial secondary production
  • Carbon cycle
  • Humboldt Current System
  • Hypoxia
  • Planktonic Archaea
  • Prokaryote secondary production
  • Upwelling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Geology

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