A longitudinal study: Affective wellbeing, psychological wellbeing, self-efficacy and academic performance among first-year undergraduate students

Rubia Cobo-Rendón, María V. Pérez-Villalobos, Marcela Gracia-Leiva, Darío Páez-Rovira

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Students’ mental health have a greatest impact on wellbeing and academic performance, also is often affected adaptation to the university life. This study examines the proportion of students with a positive and negative affect balance, and the relationship between affective wellbeing and academic self-efficacy and performance. It also analyzes how psychological wellbeing and academic self-efficacy predict affective wellbeing and academic performance. In a sample of 200 undergraduate students (M = 19.07 years), it was found that positive affect decreased and negative affect increased during the second academic year. The majority had a positive affect balance (AB). Psychological wellbeing predicts positive emotions and its achievement dimension predicts academic performance. 53% of participating students maintained a positive AB, 14% maintained a negative AB and 21% went from a negative to a positive AB one. The change from a positive to a negative AB (10%) is associated with an increase in psychological wellbeing, suggesting a process of post-stress growth in relation to the challenges of university life.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)518-526
    Number of pages9
    JournalScandinavian Journal of Psychology
    Volume61
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2020

    Keywords

    • academic self-efficacy
    • Affective wellbeing
    • psychological wellbeing
    • university students

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Developmental and Educational Psychology
    • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
    • Psychology(all)

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